Notice-Recognize-Respond

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Early years education works best when children have opportunities to explore their environment and experience learning in more meaningful and engaging ways. Children will develop better motoric, cognitive, social and emotional abilities based on their age development. In order to support children’s learning, teachers should be aware of their students’ needs and engage with the learning itself. 

       One essential framework that helps teachers to develop deeper understanding about their students’ learning needs is ‘Notice-Recognize-Respond’. It provides detailed information about students as individuals for teachers to plan, assess their students’ learning and develop further teaching-learning process.      

How ‘Notice-Recognize-Respond’ Works in My Class?
     
I use a ‘Notice-Recognize-Respond’ framework to promote successful whole-child education and develop appropriate approaches to each student. 

Notice

  • Notice the interest of students.
  • Observe the children during their play either in groups or a solitary play.
  • Involve with them and discuss about the activities.
  • Record the information through photos, interviews, and notes.  

Recognize

  • Understand what they are trying to learn.
  • Discuss the possible learning with them.

Respond

  • Change the environment to deepen the students’ learning.
  • Provide the continuation of students’ exploration.  

 I conduct ‘Notice-Recognize-Respond’ in my class as follows.

Trevor’s Learning Story:

Trevor explored his school playground and stopped in front of one plant. He was interested in a part of the plant. He observed there were some green, round shapes. He showed his finding to his teacher and asked what they were. His teacher asked him to guess what they were and he guessed those were fruits. His teacher didn’t tell Trevor what they were and suggested that he observe them for a few weeks. Trevor agreed to the idea. The next day, his teacher shared Trevor’s experience with the class and played a video about the parts of a plant. She provided a chart for Trevor so he could draw the changes as they happened to the mysterious green round shapes. He observed them the following day and drew what he saw on the chart. He tried to be consistent in observing the plant.  A few weeks after, he saw that they had turned into small white things. He showed his teacher the change. His teacher asked him what they were and he answered they were tiny flowers. His teacher told him those green round shapes are called buds. Trevor told his teacher that it took some time for the buds to turn into flowers.

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Julie Ikayanti
PYP B teacher
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