The Art of Storytelling

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Have you ever wondered how teachers like us do storytelling? What are the different ideas in storytelling? How will you tell a funny or a scary story? These are some questions that popped up in one of our coffee breaks.

To begin with,

What is story telling?

The National Storytelling Network defines storytelling as an action that involves a two-way interaction between a storyteller and one or more listeners. Storytelling happens in many situations, from kitchen-table conversation to religious rituals, from telling in the course of other work to performances for thousands of paying listeners. Some storytelling situations demand informality. Others are highly formal. Some demand certain themes, attitudes, and artistic approaches. The expectations about listener interaction and the nature of the story itself vary widely.

Our students define storytelling as:

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And as teachers, we define storytelling as a way of expressing our feelings through story. Storytelling is enticing the listener to create mental images while we tell through words and actions. Storytelling connects the storyteller and the listener through imagination. Most of the interesting stories are about people. Therefore to make a story better to be understood, focus your story to real-life characters.

How do you choose a story?

The secret of a worthwhile story time is choosing the right book.

Children should be exposed to broad types of literature available to them in the classroom and as much as possible at home. Literature types include picture books, big books, concept books, chapter books, pop-up books, sensory books, nursery rhyme books, fairytale books, and folktale books.

How do you tell a story?

There are easy ways of telling a story to children:

  1. Reader’s position

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The storyteller should be relaxed and comfortably seated or standing up.

2. Position of book

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Hold the book and visual aids where children can view it well. Show the pictures slowly around the audience.

3. Actions

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Use actions that go with the story to add interest. The body movement is an important factor in telling a story.

4. Eye contact

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Use eye contact to relate to your audience. Let your eyes and facial expression help tell them the story.

5. Speed

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Use a clear, natural speaking voice and vary the pace according to the story. Take time and never rush through the story.

6. Response of children/peers

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Respect children’s comments and reactions, yet retain control of the group.

How do you introduce a story?

  • Unlock difficult words that will be encountered in the story.
  • Ask motivating questions related to the child’s experience that will arouse his/her interest in the story.
  • Set the stage for the story and capture the children’s attention before you begin to read.
  • Make the children sit well
  • Begin by telling the title, author, and illustrator.

Storytelling presentation and activities in a creative way:

  • Making a story book

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  •   Comic strip

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  •  Role play (puppet)
  •  Story cube

   

   

  • See through story

Storyteller use projector screen as a tool to tell story.

  •  Story maze/ story map

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As we end our coffee break, stories about work, family, students and whatever under the sun continue to flood our imagination. We hope you were able to get some ideas from one of our coffee breaks. So sip that cup of coffee and share your story with a friend.

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By: Camelia Tjandra and Jose Noel Veloso

Grade 1 Teachers

BINUS SCHOOL Simprug

ctjandra@binus.edu; jveloso@binus.edu

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