Month: June 2017

Jakarta Multicultural School – Y5 PYP Exhibition

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As we know in the final year of the PYP, students, carry out an extended, in-depth, collaborative project known as the PYP exhibition. JMS students worked collaboratively to conduct an in-depth inquiry into real life issues of water pollution and the importance of recycling under the unit Sharing the Planet – save the Earth as its the only planet with chocolates. Students collectively synthesised all of the essential elements of the PYP in ways that can be shared with the whole school community.

To go further with the Inquiry they visited the XS project which is a non-profit organization (Yayasan) that works to improve the lives of families living in Jakarta’s trash picker communities.

There they learnt that the XSProject receives donations of discarded materials such as billboards, banners and automobile upholstery. From this waste, they create fun, functional and upcycled products that find a new life with consumers and create social awareness about the effects of trash.

Our students along with the parents took part into the exhibition process with lot of enthusiasm. With the collaborating support of the parents,the head of school and under the guidance of the mentors the students were able to film a short move called “Tomorrow Land” where they went into the future to show how life would be if without any nature around us.

Various areas of curriculum were also covered during the whole exhibition preparation like Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Health and nutrition.

The students also got the opportunity to interview Mr. Asrul one of the directors from another project that works to save the marine life, specifically the corals. The organization is known as Yayasan terumburupa, and consists of divers that collaborate and work to restore the corals and help them grow. The best part is that we can also adopt a coral and contribute our little in saving Mother Earth.

The students had fun creating different games for the visitors, making posters, putting up all the display, making different models of sea creatures, filming the movie and learnt a lot during the field trips and interviews as well.

By Ms Saran Kaur

Year 5 Teacher

saran@jimsch.org

Here are a few pictures from our Exhibition from the batch of 2016-2017

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Teaching Through Games

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Let’s play games!

Teachers use lots of ways in conducting their lessons. One of them is through games. The advantages of using games for students include:

  1. Competition factor: Generate positive competition among peers to achieve stated objectives of the games
  2. Discipline factor: Allow students to be able to follow series of instructions or rules.
  3. Unity factor: Teach students about teamwork, sense of belonging and unselfishness. Games also encourage the students to play for teams instead of their own personal accomplishment.
  4. Confidence factor: Games enhance students’ confidence and communication skills.

Here are some games that I have used for teaching students mathematical concepts.

Game 1: “Throw the Ball”

Rules:

  1. Place 4 trays in line. Put some division facts in each tray. The closest tray consists of the most difficult questions. The easiest questions are in the furthest tray.
  2. Students make a line and give them a ball (I used ping pong balls) and asked them to shoot the ball into the tray. Yes, most of them tried to shoot the ball in the furthest tray, which has the easiest questions.
  3. If the ball is out, students will line up again from the back.

4. Once the ball got into the tray, ask students to get a piece of paper and answer the questions by themselves.

5. If they can’t answer in a given time, students will then line up from the back.

6. Finish this game until all the questions have been answered.

Game 2: “Solving Word Problems”

Rules:

  1. Prepare papers with question. Label each paper 1, 2, 3 and so on.
  2. Divide class into groups.
  3. Each group stands in front of a piece of paper.
  4. Let students answer the questions on post-it notes. Tell them to put the answers at the back of the paper.

5. Ask students to move clockwise to the next paper.

6. Stop until all the groups are back to their first paper.

7. Discuss the answers together.

Game 3: “Group Yourselves Equally”

Rules:

  1. The students stand in a circle.

2. Give the question, “Group yourselves into 2”, “Group yourselves into 3”, and so on.

3. Ask students to count how many groups they made.

4. Write down the number with the equal answers. Examples include 9 (18 ÷ 2) and 6 (18 ÷ 3).

5. Discuss why some students were not in groups. It means the number cannot be divided equally. Examples are 18 ÷ 4 and 18 ÷ 5.

6. Discuss and review what numbers are really equal if you divide for 18.

 

I found that the students really enjoyed these games. The students actively participated and cooperated well during the activities. Using games in teaching creates an exciting learning atmosphere for the students and the teachers as well.

By: Debby Selvianita

Grade 1 Co-Teacher

BINUS SCHOOL Simprug

dselvianita@binus.edu

Reference:

Yahmad, S. B. H. Motivating students with games.

Authentic Assessment

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Authentic assessment measures learning achievements that are worthwhile, significant, and meaningful. An authentic assessment requires students to be at the center of the learning and should allow students to select from a variety of tasks. The assessment should require students to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired. Parents can use data from their child’s authentic assessments to understand how to best help their child. Understanding how their child learns best.

How can parents help with authentic assessments?

Assessment is an opportunity to help your child improve. Parents should discuss any concerns they may have with the teachers. This will assist both teachers and parents when deciding what could possibly be done next to support the student. To make sure that the learning continues at home and at school, these are Questions Your Child’s Teacher Would Love to Answer about Assessment:

  • What are the most important and complex ideas my child needs to understand?
  • What can I do to support the learning at home?
  • What kinds of questions do you ask my children on a daily basis?
  • What are the teaching strategies you will use throughout the unit?

By having a similar perspective of the assessment, parents and school can cooperate to identify what students know, understand, can do, and value at different stages in the teaching and learning process. It is also expected that the students can make meaning of each little thing they learn at school by themselves and relate it to their lives.

How do we assess what students know and what students want to learn?

Pre-assessment

At Cikal, pre-assessment plays an important role in a teacher’s ability to differentiate instruction. We set pre-assessments before we deliver the instruction in a curricular unit in order to gain an understanding of what our students know, understand, and are able to do. Without pre-assessment, we do not know the readiness of our students for new learning. For example in Year 3,  we begin with unpacking the central idea or learning topic through discussion. Observations can be conducted by the teacher to identify which students have or have not achieved mastery of specific objectives.

Having a question-answer activity during a lesson, is also another useful strategy we use in class.

Teacher: How can you understand the author’s purpose if you only look at the book’s cover?

Click the video link :

Language and Literature : The Author’s Purpose

Using this strategy in the classroom will provide an opportunity for each student in a group to record individual responses and ideas (prior knowledge) regarding an issue, topic or question. The strategy can also be used to brainstorm ideas or record researched information. It will help teachers to plan learning activities that address various levels of student readiness as well.

Formative Assessment

It’s important to use a variety of teaching and learning formative assessments, changing them frequently to stimulate both students and teachers. Assessment techniques are only as limited as the teacher’s imagination! -globaldigitalcitizen-

During our Economic unit, teachers asked students to express their understanding of the concept of economics. To assist with this process the teacher had set up the class as a market, where students became involved as customer / buyers. They were given a sum of money to be spent for their needs. Throughout this process, teachers could observe how students participated in the buying and selling process. This information was then utilized when teachers delivered future lessons.

This kind of activity helps teachers evaluate the learning process, adjust the plan for the next learning and create an effective summative for the students.

Click the video link :

Supply and Demand Activity

Summative Assessment

In Year 3, summative assessments are generally creative, evaluative and reflective, rather than paper and pencil tests that only assess students’ knowledge. Teachers will give students the opportunity to improve themselves. For instance, in our Math Summative Assessment project where the central idea was ‘we use fractions to make our lives easier’, students were asked to make a pizza with toppings. This project was chosen as the project should be simple, useful and apply in our life. To begin the project, students collected a pizza box (any size) as the main material. Students were provided with a set of instructions, for example, they needed to divide the pizza into 8 equal parts, choose pizza toppings to represent particular fractions (at least 3 different fractions needed to be modeled ⅛, 2/8, 4/8), convert the fraction into 3 forms of equivalent fraction and order them from the least to greatest fraction. The students showed enthusiasm during this project, not just because they like pizza, but because they could understand why they were learning.

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Ari Wibowo

Grade 4 Teacher

Sekolah Cikal Cilandak

Solving Problems The United Nations Ways

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Another school year is about to end.  As an IB teacher, it is a necessary to look back on the school year that was and reflect on the best, as well as the most challenging practices that you and your kids went through.  It may not always seem like it, yet I believe that the most challenging tasks make the most effective learning experiences.  I am honoured to have been given this privilege of sharing a glimpse of one of my most rewarding and productive performance tasks in Year 5 this year.  

Unit 5 embraces the transdisciplinary theme, “Sharing the planet,” with the central idea: People can establish practices in order to sustain and maintain the Earth’s resources and with the following lines of inquiry: (a) the limited nature of the Earth’s resources, (b) personal choices that can help to sustain the environment, (c) reusing and recycling different materials, and (d) reducing waste.  Planning and preparations are the most taxing part of teaching in an IB school.  PYP planning and preparation have this trick of making you begin thinking of an end in your mind.  Yes, from the scope and sequence, I had to plan for a summative assessment involving knowledge, skills and attitudes that I would like my students to learn and achieve, which should also be anchored to the writing genre of that unit.  And since it is not only for my personal stand- alone planning, it has demanded a collaborative effort among the other teachers in the team.  As a result, ICT, Maths and UoI have been been supporting our English performance task assessment.

Persuasive writing is not very popular among students.  For one, they are required to present them orally, after writing it. Having these particular students 2 years in a row gave me the opportunity to get to know them well and see what more they can do to let them push themselves beyond their limits.  I know it will be a big challenge, but it is going to be worth it.

I still remember the day when I first broke the news to them that they are going to engage themselves in a MUNA simulation as their Unit 5’s performance task.  Blank faces. Clueless stares. Unending reactions of ha? I can still vividly remember the expressions from the faces of every student in my class that day. The reaction didn’t change even after I explained what it was about.  Reactions only changed  days after we started planning and preparing for it.   

MUNA simulation is a simulation of the United Nations Assembly in solving various world problems. Since the unit is about sustaining an maintaining Earth’s resources, I assigned everyone in a group and every group to a country.  Their task was to research for at least 3 of their country’s natural resources problems.  From those 3, they had to come up with just 1.  And from that, as a group, they had to think about possible and effective solutions to solve it. And then, they will have to present this in a simulation of a United Nations Forum, following the rules and procedures of the United Nations assembly in solving world issues.  In addition to that, during the simulation, they had to convince the delegates from other countries to support their resolutions.  So, they had to answer the questions that would be thrown to them, and be able to defend their position when being questioned.  From that day on, a shift in the way they dealt with the task had changed. And the rest was history.

On the day of the MUNA simulation, everyone looked so professional. They got the feeling of being a real UN delegate. They were wearing formal attire, and holding folders of everything that they had researched and discussed about during the process.  The rules and procedures were followed religiously.  Everyone got the chance to deliver a speech.  Every group got the chance to shine, by being prepared with their questions and their answers for other countries’ clarification and motions. Everything was mostly based on researched facts and collaborative decision. The exchange of thoughts and ideas was spontaneous and professionally handled by every delegate.  

This activity only proves that you can not underestimate children.  You may think that they are still very young to deal with global issues. But if you equip them with meaningful knowledge and the right skills, and prepared them accordingly, they can do wonders.  And oh, yes, there were some glitches along the way.  There were groups who would blame each other and think that they wouldn’t be able to make it, collaboration concerns, personal differences issues.  But we should remember that everything about it, including the glitches and crashes, were parts of the learning experience.  And yes, most of the time, they are the most valuable ones.  

Here are some examples of the students reflection:

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Technology in the classroom: Embedding ICT into units of inquiry

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There is no doubt that children are more engaged in technology these days than any other time in the past. Teaching and nurturing a digital native allows teachers, as digital immigrants, the opportunity to learn and adapt within an innovative digital world. Students agree that ICT tools are very beneficial in helping them complete school assignments. They believe that when ICT is integrated with teaching instructions in the classroom a more engaging and meaningful learning process will take place.

In Year 4, we are committed to embedding ICT into everyday classroom practices. Some examples of activities that have been conducted in class are:

 

  • School Email

 

Starting from Year 3,  Sekolah Cikal have provided students with a personal school email. The purpose of this email is to accommodate students needs in ICT, particularly when utilizing web applications for school purposes. In Year 4, students have to check their email regularly to keep their assignments and projects up to date.

 

  • Google Classroom

 

The need for virtual classrooms in education has been raised in order to enlarge the scope of learning. The teaching and learning process can be broaden outside the classroom, this enables both students and teachers to interact and discuss specific subjects through Google Classroom. Since the beginning of Year 4, teachers have utilized this application as a way to send school assignments and projects.

 

  • Google Docs & Google Slides

 

Year 4 utilize Google docs and Google slides as a part of our ICT commitment to paperless tasks. Google docs and Google slides allow students to collaborate on their ideas within one file. Each term, Year 4 publishes a collaborative E-Book, all students participate and share their ideas. This activity has empowered students to engage actively in their writing process.

 

  • Google Sites

 

Students are encourage to share their academic performance in a portfolio as a part of taking ownership of their learning. Google Sites is a suitable platform for Year 4 students to showcase their learning evidence and share it with their friends and parents.

WHAT’S NEW THIS TERM

As members of a lifelong learning community, Year 4 teachers are determined to continuously enhance their skills and commitment to strengthen student’s ICT competencies. In the coming term we have made arrangements for the following ICT programs:

 

  • Infographic application Canva

 

This web based app will assist Year 4 students in creating an infographic campaign about the use of media. Data collection for the infographic will be gathered using surveys as a part of our math data handling unit. Students will also need to apply principles and elements of art in their campaign.

 

  • iMovie

 

Students are expected to create a video campaign using iMovie to encourage the audience to use media safely. The skills will be developed through classroom instruction and we will consistently utilize the media resources center to heighten students ICT knowledge.

One of the challenges that teachers often encounter is the amount of distraction that arises due to the use of a gadget. Teachers frequently ask students to complete their tasks within a specific time frame and limit their distraction by implying several strategies. Students can easily get carried away when they are in front of technological devices.

Here are a few ways to enhance students self regulated skills as well as prevent over attachment to gadgets at home:

  1. Parents and children can establish an essential agreement on how to use the technological devices or web based applications safely.
  2. Parents and children can create a schedule of appropriate time for using the device, and plan fun physical activities for children to engage in at other times.
  3. Parents can remind children about the importance of moderation. Be sure to offer praise when they demonstrate restraint in the use of technological devices and follow the agreement that has been set.
  4. Write down the objective for using a technological device and set a time limit. Ensure children adhere to the time constraint.

Laksmi Wijayanti

Grade 4 teacher

Sekolah Cikal