Authentic Assessment

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Authentic assessment measures learning achievements that are worthwhile, significant, and meaningful. An authentic assessment requires students to be at the center of the learning and should allow students to select from a variety of tasks. The assessment should require students to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired. Parents can use data from their child’s authentic assessments to understand how to best help their child. Understanding how their child learns best.

How can parents help with authentic assessments?

Assessment is an opportunity to help your child improve. Parents should discuss any concerns they may have with the teachers. This will assist both teachers and parents when deciding what could possibly be done next to support the student. To make sure that the learning continues at home and at school, these are Questions Your Child’s Teacher Would Love to Answer about Assessment:

  • What are the most important and complex ideas my child needs to understand?
  • What can I do to support the learning at home?
  • What kinds of questions do you ask my children on a daily basis?
  • What are the teaching strategies you will use throughout the unit?

By having a similar perspective of the assessment, parents and school can cooperate to identify what students know, understand, can do, and value at different stages in the teaching and learning process. It is also expected that the students can make meaning of each little thing they learn at school by themselves and relate it to their lives.

How do we assess what students know and what students want to learn?

Pre-assessment

At Cikal, pre-assessment plays an important role in a teacher’s ability to differentiate instruction. We set pre-assessments before we deliver the instruction in a curricular unit in order to gain an understanding of what our students know, understand, and are able to do. Without pre-assessment, we do not know the readiness of our students for new learning. For example in Year 3,  we begin with unpacking the central idea or learning topic through discussion. Observations can be conducted by the teacher to identify which students have or have not achieved mastery of specific objectives.

Having a question-answer activity during a lesson, is also another useful strategy we use in class.

Teacher: How can you understand the author’s purpose if you only look at the book’s cover?

Click the video link :

Language and Literature : The Author’s Purpose

Using this strategy in the classroom will provide an opportunity for each student in a group to record individual responses and ideas (prior knowledge) regarding an issue, topic or question. The strategy can also be used to brainstorm ideas or record researched information. It will help teachers to plan learning activities that address various levels of student readiness as well.

Formative Assessment

It’s important to use a variety of teaching and learning formative assessments, changing them frequently to stimulate both students and teachers. Assessment techniques are only as limited as the teacher’s imagination! -globaldigitalcitizen-

During our Economic unit, teachers asked students to express their understanding of the concept of economics. To assist with this process the teacher had set up the class as a market, where students became involved as customer / buyers. They were given a sum of money to be spent for their needs. Throughout this process, teachers could observe how students participated in the buying and selling process. This information was then utilized when teachers delivered future lessons.

This kind of activity helps teachers evaluate the learning process, adjust the plan for the next learning and create an effective summative for the students.

Click the video link :

Supply and Demand Activity

Summative Assessment

In Year 3, summative assessments are generally creative, evaluative and reflective, rather than paper and pencil tests that only assess students’ knowledge. Teachers will give students the opportunity to improve themselves. For instance, in our Math Summative Assessment project where the central idea was ‘we use fractions to make our lives easier’, students were asked to make a pizza with toppings. This project was chosen as the project should be simple, useful and apply in our life. To begin the project, students collected a pizza box (any size) as the main material. Students were provided with a set of instructions, for example, they needed to divide the pizza into 8 equal parts, choose pizza toppings to represent particular fractions (at least 3 different fractions needed to be modeled ⅛, 2/8, 4/8), convert the fraction into 3 forms of equivalent fraction and order them from the least to greatest fraction. The students showed enthusiasm during this project, not just because they like pizza, but because they could understand why they were learning.

cikal cilandak.png

Ari Wibowo

Grade 4 Teacher

Sekolah Cikal Cilandak

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