assessment

Authentic Assessment

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Authentic assessment measures learning achievements that are worthwhile, significant, and meaningful. An authentic assessment requires students to be at the center of the learning and should allow students to select from a variety of tasks. The assessment should require students to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired. Parents can use data from their child’s authentic assessments to understand how to best help their child. Understanding how their child learns best.

How can parents help with authentic assessments?

Assessment is an opportunity to help your child improve. Parents should discuss any concerns they may have with the teachers. This will assist both teachers and parents when deciding what could possibly be done next to support the student. To make sure that the learning continues at home and at school, these are Questions Your Child’s Teacher Would Love to Answer about Assessment:

  • What are the most important and complex ideas my child needs to understand?
  • What can I do to support the learning at home?
  • What kinds of questions do you ask my children on a daily basis?
  • What are the teaching strategies you will use throughout the unit?

By having a similar perspective of the assessment, parents and school can cooperate to identify what students know, understand, can do, and value at different stages in the teaching and learning process. It is also expected that the students can make meaning of each little thing they learn at school by themselves and relate it to their lives.

How do we assess what students know and what students want to learn?

Pre-assessment

At Cikal, pre-assessment plays an important role in a teacher’s ability to differentiate instruction. We set pre-assessments before we deliver the instruction in a curricular unit in order to gain an understanding of what our students know, understand, and are able to do. Without pre-assessment, we do not know the readiness of our students for new learning. For example in Year 3,  we begin with unpacking the central idea or learning topic through discussion. Observations can be conducted by the teacher to identify which students have or have not achieved mastery of specific objectives.

Having a question-answer activity during a lesson, is also another useful strategy we use in class.

Teacher: How can you understand the author’s purpose if you only look at the book’s cover?

Click the video link :

Language and Literature : The Author’s Purpose

Using this strategy in the classroom will provide an opportunity for each student in a group to record individual responses and ideas (prior knowledge) regarding an issue, topic or question. The strategy can also be used to brainstorm ideas or record researched information. It will help teachers to plan learning activities that address various levels of student readiness as well.

Formative Assessment

It’s important to use a variety of teaching and learning formative assessments, changing them frequently to stimulate both students and teachers. Assessment techniques are only as limited as the teacher’s imagination! -globaldigitalcitizen-

During our Economic unit, teachers asked students to express their understanding of the concept of economics. To assist with this process the teacher had set up the class as a market, where students became involved as customer / buyers. They were given a sum of money to be spent for their needs. Throughout this process, teachers could observe how students participated in the buying and selling process. This information was then utilized when teachers delivered future lessons.

This kind of activity helps teachers evaluate the learning process, adjust the plan for the next learning and create an effective summative for the students.

Click the video link :

Supply and Demand Activity

Summative Assessment

In Year 3, summative assessments are generally creative, evaluative and reflective, rather than paper and pencil tests that only assess students’ knowledge. Teachers will give students the opportunity to improve themselves. For instance, in our Math Summative Assessment project where the central idea was ‘we use fractions to make our lives easier’, students were asked to make a pizza with toppings. This project was chosen as the project should be simple, useful and apply in our life. To begin the project, students collected a pizza box (any size) as the main material. Students were provided with a set of instructions, for example, they needed to divide the pizza into 8 equal parts, choose pizza toppings to represent particular fractions (at least 3 different fractions needed to be modeled ⅛, 2/8, 4/8), convert the fraction into 3 forms of equivalent fraction and order them from the least to greatest fraction. The students showed enthusiasm during this project, not just because they like pizza, but because they could understand why they were learning.

cikal cilandak.png

Ari Wibowo

Grade 4 Teacher

Sekolah Cikal Cilandak

Using Anecdotal Records to Assess and Document Student Learning

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One of the assessment tools that teachers can use is an anecdotal record, which is a written note based on student observation.

An anecdotal record does not need to be written like a long narrative report, but it is recommended that it should be brief and contain significant details such as the first name of the child, date when the record was conducted, setting and event. In addition, an anecdotal record becomes more authentic if the teacher can capture the direct quotes stated by the child.  The direct quotes need not be edited for the purpose of preserving the originality of the student’s utterance or work.

binus-12Making use of an anecdotal record helps teachers further understand their students and is one way of documenting their learning. It also helps teachers track student behavior changes that can be used for future observations, curriculum planning and student or parent conferences.

Furthermore, an anecdotal record provides evidence of a child’s development. Specifically, an anecdotal record is used to:

 

  • better understand children’s learning over a period of time
  • provide ongoing records about individual instructional needs
  • capture significant student behavior that might otherwise be lost
  • provide ongoing documentation of student learning that may be shared with parents and teachers

Teachers can maximize the use of an anecdotal record if they do the following:

  1. Plan ahead to collect information. Teachers are suggested to identify ways on how to collect information, including using sticky notes, journals and mobile phones. In taking notes or in recording, teachers can explore different strategies such as writing a word or phrase and making codes in capturing the child’s action, words, phrases and expressions.
  2. Choose the skills to observe during different activities. It is recommended to select certain skills or approaches to learning. Teachers can also focus on certain learner profile attributes and attitudes in doing the anecdotal record.

Schools can come up with an essential agreement on the use of anecdotal record. Using an anecdotal record is aligned with IB programme standards and practices on assessment.

When teachers make use of an anecdotal record and embrace the practice, it becomes a routine. Once it is a routine, it becomes easier for teachers to write anecdotal records, which are valuable tools for assessment and help enrich the teaching and learning process.

By: Zaida Puyo

Grade 2 Level Head

BINUS SCHOOL Simprug

zpuyo@binus.edu

Notice-Recognize-Respond

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Early years education works best when children have opportunities to explore their environment and experience learning in more meaningful and engaging ways. Children will develop better motoric, cognitive, social and emotional abilities based on their age development. In order to support children’s learning, teachers should be aware of their students’ needs and engage with the learning itself. 

       One essential framework that helps teachers to develop deeper understanding about their students’ learning needs is ‘Notice-Recognize-Respond’. It provides detailed information about students as individuals for teachers to plan, assess their students’ learning and develop further teaching-learning process.      

How ‘Notice-Recognize-Respond’ Works in My Class?
     
I use a ‘Notice-Recognize-Respond’ framework to promote successful whole-child education and develop appropriate approaches to each student. 

Notice

  • Notice the interest of students.
  • Observe the children during their play either in groups or a solitary play.
  • Involve with them and discuss about the activities.
  • Record the information through photos, interviews, and notes.  

Recognize

  • Understand what they are trying to learn.
  • Discuss the possible learning with them.

Respond

  • Change the environment to deepen the students’ learning.
  • Provide the continuation of students’ exploration.  

 I conduct ‘Notice-Recognize-Respond’ in my class as follows.

Trevor’s Learning Story:

Trevor explored his school playground and stopped in front of one plant. He was interested in a part of the plant. He observed there were some green, round shapes. He showed his finding to his teacher and asked what they were. His teacher asked him to guess what they were and he guessed those were fruits. His teacher didn’t tell Trevor what they were and suggested that he observe them for a few weeks. Trevor agreed to the idea. The next day, his teacher shared Trevor’s experience with the class and played a video about the parts of a plant. She provided a chart for Trevor so he could draw the changes as they happened to the mysterious green round shapes. He observed them the following day and drew what he saw on the chart. He tried to be consistent in observing the plant.  A few weeks after, he saw that they had turned into small white things. He showed his teacher the change. His teacher asked him what they were and he answered they were tiny flowers. His teacher told him those green round shapes are called buds. Trevor told his teacher that it took some time for the buds to turn into flowers.

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Julie Ikayanti
PYP B teacher