learner profiles

Me, Myself, and Us

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As the first semester has been beginning, classes gathered to create groups of learners. Variety of students are divided into a well-considered composition of classes with proudly elected teachers to be their homeroomers. At this time of the academic year, multiple levels of adaptation are taking part and at Year 1 level of Sekolah Cikal. It is a moment to know our personal self through exploration, adaptation, and socialization process among students. We begin our new class with the unit about self-development that students learn about themselves, their preferences, strength, weakness, and how to be a better contributor. We believe it will build a foundation of togetherness as they get to know themselves and each other through the whole learning process. We get to know everybody and Who We Are.

communicator

Becoming part of our school community, Year 1 students are already familiar with IB learner profile terms. This unit is explored deeper to understand each meaning and how we can characterize those profiles in every person. We take five profiles which are considerably closed to their daily lives. Those are Thinker, Risk-taker, Communicator, Reflective, and Open-minded. They showed their prior knowledge about the profiles mostly by defining familiar words such as “Think” in Thinkers means a person who likes to think, “Open” means open and “Mind” means our thinking so it is what we think openly about everything. “Take” is a familiar words and so is “Risk”, so a risk-taker is someone who is brave enough to take risk or, as they interpret it, challenges. They were less familiar with “Communicator” and Reflective” but through an interactive discussions we came up with a person who can speak his mind and feelings fluently (communicator) and a person who never hesitates to admit their mistakes or to apologize and evaluate the impact of their actions (reflective).

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Afterwards students were encouraged to identify themselves in those profiles through team-building games where we can see how they contribute best to their team. They chose the profile they thought it suit to them most and proved it through games. It was a beautiful experience to see our youngsters learn about themselves and evaluate their actions. After each game, we put on our reflective hat and discussed about what had happened in each group, what made them win/lose, how everyone contributed, and what problems they encountered during the process. They also acknowledged their team-mate’s contribution by telling that he/she was a Thinker in the group because their solution worked best to overcome the challenge. He/she was such a risk-taker to dare to do a trial and error experiment in the process or he/she was an open-minded person who appreciated the team’s opinion and encouraged them to reach an agreement about strategies they needed to apply.

To give you a glimpse of our team-building games. Herewith, some of the challenges that we provide.

  • Save the Egg. Each team are given an egg, a pile of newspapers, and a roll of tape. The challenge is they have to figure out a way to protect the egg using only the provided materials so the egg will not break when we drop it from our tree house to the ground below.
  • Move the Ball. Each team are given a golf ball and a chopstick for each person. The challenge is for them to move the ball from one spot to the other within 10-15 feet distance using only chopsticks. They are not allowed to touch the ball with their hands.
  • Pointy Stick. Each team are given a long stick. The challenge is to move the stick using only their index fingers together.

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In my class, this was a fun journey and they enjoyed it a lot. They also gained rich experience in working together and in making contribution. They learned about losing and talked about it, which is one of the special moments to be part of. They expressed their frustration when they failed but it became a precious moment to learn to be reflective and to be open-minded to appreciate others victory. It was also an “aha” moment where they learned more about themselves and to see that they had strength they didn’t know existed and weaknesses that they never seemed to realise before. We discussed it openly in respect and it was a success in blending them in as a ‘family’ where they start off as acknowledging each other’s strength and appreciating each other’s weaknesses. Something I personally think every group of people should start their relationship with.

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The most important part of this unit is how to improve. After a long journey of knowing and using their learner’s profile as the strength they are proud of, also opening themselves to learn about things to improve, the next question is how? How do we improve ourselves? How should we overcome our weaknesses? Is there a best way to use our strength to overcome our weaknesses? We start by asking how can we contribute better?

In pairs, they discussed about their weaknesses and brainstormed ideas about how to be a better contributor. They came up with conclusions like “I need to be more of a risk-taker because I am often too afraid to try”, “I need to be more reflective because I don’t like losing. It makes me angry sometimes”, “I often don’t know how to share my ideas. I am not a communicator”, and “I just don’t know how to do it. I often forget things. I need to be more of a Thinker”. We encouraged them to make plan on being a better contributor and try to translate it into actions. What can we do? “I will try to convince myself to try”, “I will read books so I can learn new words that will help me speak better”, “I will try to listen more and give my friends a chance to lead”. It may sound difficult to engage their minds into, what it may seem as, an in depth discussion. However it is not, because the topic is actually quite basic. It is all about them! Putting them as the center of discussion is a remarkable moment for their age and it will sure grasp their attention. By starting with what happened, the challenges, and brainstorm ideas on how to contribute better are having an open discussion with “What ifs” that is also initiated an interactive discussion in some classes. Of course, there might be emotional comments or critics even blame on a particular person, however it is a precious moment to teach them how to express their feelings properly. Help them use their words so it will never occur to their mind to put pressure on others inappropriately that might lead to bullying. It will be simple if we think less difficult.

Our biggest hope as teachers in this unit is to in-still a paradigm of respect and responsibility. We believe it will be a useful value for them to carry throughout life. To be a person who constantly think about how to contribute better, know best about themselves, and respect others. These are essential traits for lifelong learners of global citizen in the future. The bonus part is teachers get to think about our own strength and weaknesses too. The question of how can we contribute better may inspire and trigger creativity and challenge us to give more. When was the last time you think about yourself?

 

August 10th 2018

Niza – Year 1 Teacher (Sekolah Cikal Cilandak)

 

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Y5 PYP EXHIBITION: DON’T BE SCARED, YOU ARE CARED

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PYP exhibition, as we know is the culmination learning process during the primary program before going to the next level, Middle Year Program. It is like a salad which contains mixed vegetables which represent the feeling during its process, such as excited, happy, tired, bored, satisfied, nervous, and relieved.

In this 2018, Sekolah Cikal Surabaya has the second Y5 PYP Exhibition with the current UOI “Sharing the Planet” with the central idea of “Children worldwide encounter a range of challenges, ranges, and opportunities”. From this central idea, students of Y5 are divided into five groups and each of them came up with five smaller topics which are juvenile delinquency, child marriage, learning disabilities, game addiction, and child trafficking. In order to help the groups, there two mentors for each group that will help them during the process.

It is long processes which last for around 8 weeks starting from January to March. All the processes are referred to the IB inquiry cycles, tuning in, finding out, sorting out, going further, making conclusion, and taking action. This long learning journey involves not only the students but also mentors, teachers, parents, and communities within and outside the schools. Students also apply their transdisciplinary skills.

In the tuning in stage, students activate their prior knowledge about what challenges that children all over the world have. Students created a mind map to list down the issues children have to deal with. In order to enlarge students’ knowledge on the issues, the teacher also showed a number of videos related to the topics discussed, such as street children in Jakarta, the different access of education between two Indonesian kids in Jakarta and Papua, child marriage and its dangers, child trafficking, children sexual abuse, child labor, UNICEF, bullying, and other issues. After watching the videos, students gave their opinion toward what happened in the video to the children. In order to deepen students’ knowledge on the issues, students observe some pictures and wrote their statement, opinion, feeling, and any ideas they have regarding to the pictures provided.

 

Figure 1 Students are doing tuning in on the issues of children’s rights and challenges

After the process of tuning in, students go to the next step which is finding out the information related to the topic chosen. Each group has concerned on one issue they want to study deeper, students with the facilitation of mentors started to find out and conduct a number of research to answer their inquiry. Doing the literature review through searching from the Internet, reading newspaper, book, and magazine. From this activity, students apply their research, ICT, and literacy skill. Students learn how to find the reliable information, avoid the hoax that is widely spreaded in the Internet, and develop their plagiarism awareness as they are required to paraphrase the information they got instead of copy-paste.

 

Figure 2 Mentoring process during PYP Exhibition preparation

 

Figure 3 Students are doing research and promoting ICT skill on the related topic

Not only doing the literature review from a number of sources, the process of finding out the information is also conducted through the field research in which students directly observe and see through doing a field trip, inviting guest speakers to be interviewed. This is expected that students promote their social skill as students have to meet and interact with new people outside their circle. Students have experienced a lot of activities outside and inside the classroom, go to UPTD Kampung Anak Negeri-a government office which concern on the protection of street children in Surabaya, go to UNICEF, PPA Polrestabes Surabaya, Lembaga Perlindungan Anak, and Sekolah Cita Hati Bunda (a special school for children with special needs) invite Save Street Children Surabaya as the social organization concerning on the street children in Surabaya and many other cities in Indonesia, invite the obsgyn to know the danger of child marriage from the medical point of view, invite the dyslexic expert from Dyslexia Parents support group. Some groups also distribute questionnaire enrich their data.

 

Figure 4 Students are doing field trip to collect the data

After having all the data, students do sorting out in order to sort which data can answer which lines of inquiry.  The results of sorting out process are in the form of various products, pictorial graphs, poster, comic strips, animation, games, and many others. Students learn how to explore their creativity in creating a number of products to be displayed.

 

Figure 5 Students present their final product

In addition, this is continued by the going further process by doing research on the new inquiry that students have after having long processes of inquiry. In this process, students strengthen their finding in the previous research by doing more research on the related topics, such as distributing questionnaire, interview society, or find the relevant sources that support them find more info and answer their inquiry.

After that, students make conclusion as well as taking action. What students can do as their action. It is various based on students’ initiative, doing campaign via self-made animation, campaign through poster, sticker, bookmark, games, drama, hip-hop dance, and student-made song entitled Don’t be Scared You are Cared with the lyric as follow:

All children in the world

Have rights don’t be scared

As you have right to be cared

We all have hope show your smile to the world

 

We have the action so please listen

Children need protection

We have the action so please listen

Children need protection

So we will be shining bright

 

Rights for everyone

Education number one

Be nice and no lies

No more kids’ cries

Love and care so kids will rise

 

We have the action so please listen

Children need protection

We have the action so please listen

Children need protection

So we will be shining bright

Don’t be scared

Don’t be scared

Don’t be scared

You are cared

 

After the long processes, the PYP Exhibition presentation is held on 14-16 March 2018. Parents, teachers, students, and other IB schools are invited to come. In this moment, students show their understanding, communication, and social skills in presenting their learning journeys. I am really proud of them when they can confidently present to the adult and answer their questions very well in comprehensive ways. Being prouder is when the students of Y5 can present the materials to the younger kids, making some adjustment on the language usage, body language to take care of their younger friends.

In this process, I am as their teacher learn a lot from them. A lot of mentors also say that they need to learn more on the topic, they are like doing thesis again. Tired yes, but the satisfaction when we can be part their success is priceless.

 

Written by: Ika Fitriani – Y5 Homeroom Teacher – Sekolah Cikal Surabaya

Sharing the Planet – Natural Resources (Grade 4)

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Central Idea: Equal access to the earth’s finite resources provides challenges for the global community.

Key Concepts: function, connection, responsibility

Related Concepts: finite resources, distribution, access, equity, conflict resolution

Lines of Inquiry:

  • Finite and infinite natural resources
  • The distribution of natural resources
  • Challenges to have equitable access to natural resources

Learning Experiences:

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Class Display

 

As the tuning in activity, students were given some pictures of different objects, such as wood, sunlight, car, drawer, cotton, shirt, coal, burger, house, crown, windmill, refinery, grain, ocean, and the electricity tower. They worked in group to classify those objects into two classifications. Some groups came up with common and uncommon things, then some classified them as nature-made and man-made. This activity held to show their prior knowledge about natural resources. Therefore, they could identify things that are natural or come from nature and those that are produced by man.

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Tuning in Activity

  After that, students showed their understanding about what natural resources are by using Frayer Model. Next, students worked in pairs to sort out objects; found out its raw material, analyzed the object, made criteria about finite and infinite, then finally defined finite and infinite. The objects are spoon, drink can, plastic, paper, cake, cloth, and glass. They did research to answer those questions.

We provided some articles to be read at home by the students, entitled “Everything Comes From The Earth” and “Natural Resouces”. They also needed to fill in the vocabulary list given. As the first line of inquiry  assessment, students worked on a T-chart about finite and infinite natural resources. They needed to write the definitian as well as the examples.

For the second line of inquiry; the distribution of natural resources, we supported the materials with an e-book called “I Need to Know: An Introduction To The Oil Industry & OPEC”. We focused this inquiry on oil as the finite resources. Students learned what crude oil is, what petroleum is, how oil is formed, why oil is important, and how to find oil (upstream) as well as refine oil (downstream). Beside reading the e-book, students need to respond to the passage by filling in several visible thinking tools as follow:

 

 

They also learned about the distribution of natural resources in Indonesia. First, they are divided into 5 groups to find out about well-known places that produce natural resources in Indonesia, such as Sumatera, Jawa, Kalimantan, Sulawesi, and Papua. Then, they traced the island in A3 paper and did research about what kind of natural resources found in those five islands, specifically in what city or area it is. 

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The distribution of natural resources in Indonesia

We also invited experts who helped us to teach students deeper about oil, especially about the distribution process of oil or petroleum, starting from the exploration process up to delivery process to the gas stations. The experts are Bapak Mega Nainggolan from PT Energi Mega Persada Tbk. (“EMP”), an independent upstream oil and gas company headquartered in Jakarta, Indonesia and Mr. Mike Irvine, one of our school parents who works for an oil company.

 

Students needed to organize the information they got from the experts by filling in the visible thinking tools provided by teachers.

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We went for an excursion, too. It was actually the library lesson program. Ibu Any, our teacher librarian, has focused on water as the natural resources learned. She took students to water filtration office in Kemang Pratama, Bekasi. The purpose of this visit is for finding out about clean water processing in Kemang Pratama area.

 

For the last line inquiry of this unit; challenges to have equitable access to natural resources, we brainstormed what challenges can be found in oil distributing process. Students analyzed the process in distributing natural resource (oil) – big picture; used post it to share what might happen within the process; discussed the challenges in distributing the oil to citizens; suggested how to minimize the challenges. Its challenges according to the students are, for example, infrastructure, signal, weather, license, local experts, accident, explosion, and technology.

 

 

After they shared their ideas about challenges in oil distribution process, we connected the lesson to IB Learner Profile focus for this unit, which are Principled and Caring. By looking at the numbers of post it stuck on the poster, students were aware that there are so many challenges in oil distribution process, so they thought of how they can apply our learner profile to minimize the challenges. Some said that as a principled person, we need to use petroleum or water wisely since they are finite resources. Moreover, we need to follow the rules or procedure when we are in the gas station to show that we are caring.

As the Summative Assessment or final project, students needed to show their understanding about natural resources’ distribution process, challenges of the distribution process, and suggestions to minimize the challenges by creating a PPT to explain them all. First, they needed to choose one finite resource, thought of its usage for life, its distribution process, challenges of the process, and suggestions to minimize the challenges then present them in a PPT. Most students chose oil to be presented since we learned more about oil than other resources. Some explained about gold, coal, and water.

 

 

For English lesson, our beloved English teacher, Mr.Swart, taught the students how to create an advertisement. As the tuning in activity, he asked them to create an advertisement about a floating hotel by using their own words or ideas. As the final assessment and connecting to our unit of inquiry, he asked students to do research about Indonesian Natural Resources and create an advertisement to promote Indonesian Natural Resources.

 

 

Author: Audrey Liana Tamba

(Grade 4 Homeroom Teacher, Sekolah Victory Plus)

audrey.liana@svp.sch.id

Collaboration

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Collaboration is an important part of teaching and learning in a PYP classroom. The Learner Profile attributes of communicators, open-minded and caring and the Attitudes, cooperation, respect, empathy and tolerance all highlight the need for all those connected to the school to be working in collaboration with one another.

Students working together

When you visit any primary classroom at ACG School Jakarta, you will see collaboration in action. Classrooms are designed with collaboration in mind, from carpet areas to table groups, students are engaging and working together. Whether students are playing in stations designed to inquire into their UOI in Kindergarten or interacting through written words in a chalk talk in Year 6 teachers are always encouraging team work.

We are not only all learners, but everyone in the classroom can be a teacher, by connecting with one another the role of ‘teacher’ extends beyond the adults in the room..

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Teachers working together

Working collaboratively is not just an activity reserved for our students. Each week teachers engage in collaborative planning with year level colleagues, specialists’ teachers and the PYP Coordinators. We also engage in collaborative team meetings as a whole staff group weekly.

According to the International Baccalaureate (2015), ‘Research and case studies suggest that by forming a network of resources, support, and guidance, teachers feel more comfortable in their roles, which subsequently has a positive effect on students.’

Through collaboration, teachers are able to share their expertise, foster a community of experience and feel confident to implement innovative approaches to teaching and learning. When ideas are shared, and built upon, we achieve a greater range of learning experiences for our students.

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Working with parents

At ACG School Jakarta, teachers work closely with families to ensure that the best outcomes are achieved for the students. This is achieved in numerous ways, including class blogs, parent-teacher-student conferences, student-led conferences and parent information sessions, just to name a few.

Parent information session engage parents in collaborative learning opportunities, aimed at educating parents about the PYP, using the approaches to learning students are engaged in everyday. Through these education session, we develop parents’ understanding of what happens in the classroom through hands on experience.

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Being a 21st century learner is all about collaboration a skill that is embedded into the philosophy of our school.

References: Collaborative teaching transforms the classroom http://blogs.ibo.org/blog/2015/07/30/collaborative-teaching-transforms-the-classroom/

Wayne Martin

Co- PYP Coordinator

ACG School Jakarta

wayne.martin@acgedu.com

WHAT KIND OF PRESIDENT ARE YOU? – A SELF EXPLORATION THROUGH IB LEARNER PROFILES

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To fulfill the IB aim of developing internationally minded students and encouraging them to be more active, compassionate and lifelong learners, it is crucial to set placed and integrate the learner profiles attribute in their daily activities right from the beginning of the school year.

My second graders were learning about ‘Role Models’. As they gained the understanding on the definition of ‘Role Model’, most of them turned to their closest ties, mother or father as their role model. When they explored further to the inquiries, they came up with both the positive traits and negative traits of several public figures they had previously known. They drew up their own conclusion of which traits to be and which are not to be followed. To expand their experience on what other people thought, Grade 2 students had an interview with the fifth graders to find out who their role models are. Through their activity reflections, I could see that interaction with the older grades was very exciting!

As part of their formative assessment, I designed a writing assignment where they could put themselves into one of the most powerful position in the world, a President! They had to come up with ‘President’s working programs’ and had to explain which learner profiles they had to perform to make the program worked.

The snapshots below are some of their ideas. Very interesting indeed!

 

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By

Ms. Yuliana Ratna Dilyanti

Homeroom Teacher Grade 2

GMIS – BALI

Inculcating the IB Learner Profile and PYP Attitudes

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Nowadays, in a fast changing world, it is not easy to teach students how to be empathetic, how to be sympathetic, how to be kind, to be tolerant, to be optimistic, to be courageous, etc. TV shows, cartoons, computer games and Internet websites and the social media are strongly influencing students’ behavior. But we teachers, as thinkers and caring individuals, strive hard to find the best way how to inculcate moral values so our students make a difference in line with IB PYP goals to prepare students to become active, caring, lifelong learners who demonstrate respect for themselves and others and have the capacity to participate in the world around them.

Today’s education should not be focusing only on increasing knowledge of students and developing their skills but to prepare them for a fulfilling life in the future. Life demands more than knowledge and skills.

So, what is our school doing to prepare the students to become active, caring and lifelong learners who demonstrate respect for themselves and others and have the capacity to participate in the world around them?

Aside from the transdisciplinary themes with central ideas and lines of inquiries that are wonderfully planned, the teachers also found out one of the best ways to inculcate moral values and that includes the IB learner profile and PYP attitudes through reading books. Books are the best tools to teach the students with moral values. There are scenarios that can help them realize that they need to put everything into perspective – others are not lucky enough – they have nothing to eat, live in a difficult and abusive life, no shelter to live in, no parents to guide them, no friends to play with, no toys to play, no cars to ride on, etc.

Four novels are specially chosen for grade 3 students to read. They are Charlotte’s Web, Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes, Justin Case and Nancy Drew.

 

These novels are ingrained with fundamental values – for every child to discover and enjoy.

1These novels are carefully chosen to help launch meaningful discussions with the students. They work best as subtle discussion starters (rather than direct ‘lecturing’ on the learner profile and PYP attitudes) – to make the value system stick, students need to come up with the conclusion themselves. So, teachers make sure to follow–up a read aloud with some open–ended questions. They include books because they believe that reading books is the best way to encourage the students to make a difference, take action whether small or big, create a positive change in the world they live in, and also for academic success.

My students started reading Charlotte’s Web, and they were able to apply what they have learned in our first two units of inquiry, which focused on rights and responsibilities and animal adaptation – which each child who has a pet should be responsible to give love and care because animals have rights too. All my students said that they are against animal cruelty, that each animal has the right to live – I laughed at this. But others were asking- how about the animals that we eat? Is that also animal cruelty? Students had long discussions and arguments about this issue. They gave out their best reasons and persuaded others that it is animal cruelty or not.

3After reading Charlotte’s Web, we watched the movie version. Students came up with the conclusion that the book was a story of friendship between Wilbur and Charlotte – that a true friend is going to risk his/her life for one’s own good. After watching the movie, students were asked who among their classmates was their best friend. They wrote a letter to their best friend and stated why their friendship is true and to be kept. After giving the letter to their best friend, students were asked to reply to each other’s letter. While giving the response letter, they sang a song about friendship.

You’re My Best friend
Many people say true friends are hard to find

But I know I’m not that kind

They come and go and sometimes leave us behind

Like a wind that passes by
Chorus

(Cause)When you need a friend

That you can depend

You can count on me because you’re my best friend

When you’re feeling down and your heart is hurt

You can call on me and

I’ll be there for you friend
Good things may come and then bad things may go

Like a birth a long time ago

You’re like the ship that’s sailing across the sea

To the waves that’s so unkind
(Repeat Chorus)

(Repeat Chorus) Hold

(Repeat Chorus)
Coda

Friend

4The second novel that they read was ‘Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes.’ Before they started reading, we had some learning engagements. Students filled in a prediction chart, watched videos and looked at pictures about what happened during World War 2 and the aftermath of the explosion in Hiroshima. Then they answered the four question on a Y-Chart: what did you see, what did you hear, what did you feel and what do you worry about – to give them background of what really happened during the war. Most of the students wrote that they were really scared and sad at the same time. They wondered how the people back then survived the explosion and how they rebuilt their lives after the war. Most of them were also worried that another war may happen though other parts of the world are having conflicts.

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The students filled in the Y – Chart after watching videos and looking at the pictures of the aftermath of World War 2.

 

Our Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes center

8Reading the novel, students were able to describe Sadako using the IB learner profile and PYP attitudes. Students pointed out that Sadako learned to stay positive and courageous despite having been inflicted with a debilitating disease. Students also learned that they have to be determined, never give up and always hope that everything will be alright in God’s will. They learned how to empathize with Sadako’s struggles.

The third novel that students read was Justin Case. They were very excited to start our activities and find out the things that happened to the main character because it is a story of a boy who worries a lot. The boy is a worrywart and most of the students were able to relate to him. The students were asked to describe Justin as well as the other characters in the story using the IB learner profile and PYP attitudes. Since Justin likes to describe his teacher and writes down his experiences in school, they were also asked to describe their teacher (others wrote poems about their teachers) and penned down their experience on their first day of school.

 

Students, together with their parents, are reading their first day of school experiences and their descriptions of their teachers just like what Justin usually does.

11The last but not least novel was Nancy Drew. Most of the students loved the novel because it is suspense-filled and is about solving dangerous mysteries. Students loved it because one should be a risk-taker and thinker to find clues and be knowledgeable to be able to solve the crime or mystery.
It is really essential to inculcate in the students the IB learner profile and PYP attitudes, and one way to do this is through reading. Through reading, students learn important life lessons. Having a respectable behavior is a must at a very young age. This can help the students make a difference, be open-minded and tolerant about differences in beliefs, cultures, traditions, etc. If students around the world are open–minded and tolerant, our world will be in safe hands and world peace will just be around the corner.

By: Freitz Gerald Talavera

Grade 3 Classroom Teacher

BINUS SCHOOL Simprug

ftalavera@binus.edu

Actions Speak Louder than Words

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Action is integral to PYP. Here in Mentari School Jakarta, we have plenty of grandiose events we are proud of. From small actions in the classroom, where children made good choices about how they behave with each other, to large scale projects that happen after intense learning and leave a deep impression on children.

The most important part of PYP action is daily classroom practice although this is not always made explicit. Nevertheless the power also comes in encouraging good daily choices to turn into daily actions. Smaller everyday actions can provide ongoing reflection and develop in depth pattern of thought and action.

Living the IB learner profile and PYP attitudes gives a clear idea of the morally articulate and ethical people who should arise from IB schools. They are caring and thoughtful about the world. Also because values and thoughts are not taught in separate lessons but with a coherent and integrated approach.

Action in PYP has three components: choose, act, reflect. Students choose an action, actually do it and reflect on its efficacy. This reflection may lead a new choices and the cycle begins again.

It is important that children learn to make good choices, to think for themselves and take responsibility in a realistic way that is age appropriate. Actions can have enduring impact when they affect a student’s inner conviction which requires genuine choice and genuine responsibility.

Actions therefore help develop students’ personality. Big actions can be time consuming but they can be also rich learning experiences for many children. Everyday actions can be carried out regularly. Even the smallest of choices can be powerful in developing habits of making thoughtful choices, and sustaining to carry them out over a period of time.

When big and small actions are combined with any programme of inquiry, it develops students who are emphathic to global problems to become global citizens.

Small, everyday actions can happen at home too. This is a good point for parent involvement. Here is MSJ, we let parents report to us action that they notice at home. That action is not only recognised and applauded but acknowledged across school. This is done by putting up visual examples of students action on the school board that says, “Mentari Takes Action”.  Action gets contagious this way and children are making good choices not only at school but also at home.

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Nidhi Khanija

PYP Coordinator

Mentari School Jakarta

nidhi@mis.sch.id