learning story

Our Study of Numbers

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The students in Grade 3 showed how they construct their understanding of numbers, from different ways of representing number values, place values to using numbers to make patterns. The situations created for students helped them to make the necessary constructions. We have attempted to aim for more meaningful learning by veering away from too much repetitive number drills in class. Here are some sample works:

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Karen Chacon

Homeroom Teacher Grade 3

Mentari School Jakarta

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Healthy Food Healthy Body

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We all know that eating right can help us maintain a healthy body .Students created a “Healthy Eating Plate “which was well labeled and with a brief write up .The main message of the Healthy Eating Plate is to focus on how our food, drink, and activity choices affect our health. Healthy Eating Plate guidelines can lead to a lower risk of diseases. This was related to our unit Body system.

This gave the students an opportunity to develop their active learning process through inquiry and investigating skills as they asked descriptive questions to collect information connecting different food to different body system.

It promoted positive attitude toward learning how to keep our body systems healthy. They took responsibility for their own and family health and physical wellbeing.

While working on this students came up with debate on “Is healthy eating the same as going on a diet?” and many more how and why statements came up related to our body system and how different food effects different body system

My Healthy Plate serves as a motivational rather than prescriptive tool!

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By

Ms. Reena Dhar

Homeroom Teacher Grade 3

GMIS – BALI

BEAR HUNT

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We value reading time the most at Sekolah Ciputra. We read aloud daily to our students. However, this could be challenging for PG B students, especially during the first weeks of school when they are adjusting to their new classes. Only a few of them listened intently to the stories when we read aloud for the first time. In spite of this, we kept reading them a book every day. To grow the love of reading in our class, we picked a book that was based on students’ interests. We noticed that our students were mainly interested in stories that involved animals. Our choice went to We’re Going on a Bear Hunt.

When we read the book for the first time, we recognized that more students paid attention to the story and were willing to listen. After reading the book, we watched the movie version. The movie was such a hit among the students. They asked us to watch it during their snack time. We kept reading and re-reading We’re Going on a Bear Hunt for a week during our reading aloud time so that the students could fully understand the story. Our next step was to make a picture sequence of the story and did one-on-one interviews with the student to gauge their understandings. This was also one of our ways to develop their communication and thinking skills.

In our third week of school, we noticed that more and more students were willing to visit our reading centre to read. Reading is also a very good opportunity to teach them about caring for books. We modeled for them how to open pages gently and we told them we had to do it so that we can read our book the next day. Everyday after reading aloud, we ask “who wants to help to take the book back to the shelf?” and each time we hear a lot of voices wanting to help put the book back. What a very fun way to learn to take care of our class library and to foster a love of reading!

Yulinar – PYP PG B Team Leader

yulinar@sekolahciputra.sch.id

 

 

ENGAGING TREASURE HUNT SCHOOL TOUR

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The first week at the beginning of the school year is a commencement period, a period to get to know the immediate surrounding and  Cikal community . Back from a long holiday, students are all excited to see what’s new in Sekolah Cikal Cilandak. The building, new classroom setup, new teachers (as they are now in different level), new classmates, and new things to learn and explore.

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Usually, teachers take students to go around the school, as a way to get to know the environment and people around the school. This year, grade 3 and 4 students are taking their treasure hunt activity to the next level. They use  iPads to scan the QR codes. These codes are posted on the walls, each one contain clues or instructions, such  as; “Rhythm, beat, is played in here, loud and clear” or “ you need to find the PYP Coordinator”.  When they found the answer, they will see another QR code to scan for the next problem or questions to solve.

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In short, we turn school tour activity into PokemonGO-like game, where the person who play it has to scan the surrounding, not by using augmented reality apps, just QR code reader and print-out QR codes posted the school’s walls.

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QR code can be used in the classroom as well, it makes teaching and learning more fun, engaging and challenging. Here are some ideas:

  1. Replacing boring written test or quiz into mobile and more interactive quiz activity. Create the quiz in Google Form, generate the link into QR code, print it on paper, and post it on classroom wall. You can include  QR codes in bus stop activity, each QR code stands for one question /problem. Students can only move to the next station once they managed to  solve the problem.  
  2. Differentiate Task. For example you are teaching about governmental system and you have some videos and articles for your students to go through. Divide the class into several groups, have them watch different videos or read different articles. Post the link into QR codes in several learning stations, have them discuss it in groups.
  3. Treasure Hunt game/ Pokemonlike game. Use the QR code as clues for playing treasure hunt game. Insert links of riddles or clues that can lead the way  to the next station. Just like we did for school tour activity in Sekolah Cikal.

Here is how to make a QR code:

  1. Copy the link of the file, video, website or social media page that you want to share.
  2. Open QR code generator such as kaywa.com, mobile-barcodes.com or beetagg.com, or just simply googled QR generator and it will display many webpage of QR generators.
  3. Once you received a png or jpeg image from the QR generator, you can share or print your QR code.

The children’s face beamed with excitement as they  went around the school looking for  another QR code to be found.  Occasionally we heard them  saying something like, “This is awesome!” and “I like this activity” and “This is the best treasure hunt ever!”.

The use of technology has definitely adds zest in the learning process. Not only for the children, but for the teachers as well. We come to realize, that when handled well it can be a tool to ignite further learning and create ideas.  

Marsaria Primadona (Pima)

Apple Distinguished Educator

PYP Coordinator

Sekolah Cikal Cilandak

 

The Benefits of Interschool Collaboration.

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Given the difficulties (political, corporate and logistical ) that we face as a company sponsored school based on a mountain top in Papua, we at Yayasan Pendidikan Jayawijaya Tembagapura often find ourselves feeling isolated from the greater IB community. Movement off the mountain is difficult at the best of times and when it comes to trying to get a group of students to be able to visit another school or exhibition, it is neigh impossible. Luckily, here in Tembagapura we have two IBO schools, our own YPJ TPRA and the Mount Zaagham School (MZS), which provides opportunity for collaboration. While the make-up of our two schools is very different with MZS providing education for the children of the expat workers at Grasberg Mine and PT Freeport and YPJ being the school for national and Papuan students; we do share a compound, community and the PYP. With these direct connections, the existence of interschool collaboration is a natural occurrence.

Because of the aforementioned isolation, interschool collaborative learning has significant meaning for bridging the social and educational gaps between our schools and providing much needed collaborative opportunities for our teachers and students. The understanding that our two schools are able to achieve more working together than is possible working in isolation and that the combined effort and resources of our two schools will produce better outcomes than relying each as a single school have led to some very successful collaborations between us.

A great example of this collaborative practice is the recent Kartini Day celebration in which our two schools worked together to create a program in which students grades in one through nine from both schools came together in a celebration of the ideals and values that Raden Adjeng Kartini stood for. One of our teachers Aron Vaughn worked closely with the Art and Bahasa Indonesian teachers from MZS to create collaborative activities such as mural painting, plays and dances that brought our two schools together for a wonderful celebration of the theme of Equality: All Life is Valuable. To all accounts, it was a great success with students and teachers from both schools learning and celebrating together.

Having the opportunity to collaborate with another IB school has afforded other benefits to our teachers and students such as:

-A greater ability of students to view situations from others’ perspectives.

-Creating an environment of active, involved, exploratory learning.

-Encouraging diversity understanding.

-Establishing an atmosphere of cooperation.

-Students develop responsibility for each other.

-The development of tolerance.

-The development of the ability to adopt perspectives and the understanding different from their own points of view.

Taking the opportunity to bring diverse students, teachers and schools together and providing opportunities to construct understanding through a collaborative atmosphere is at the heart of the PYP and one that we look forward to continuing in the coming years.

 

A Snapshot of Our PYP Journey

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Sekolah Yayasan Pendidikan Jayawijaya, Kuala Kencana, Papua

by Sandra Beardmore, PYP Coordinator.

(There were many aspects of change, program and school development as we travelled the road to PYP Accreditation, I share a small slice in this article.)

In 2012 Sekolah YPJ, Kuala Kencana, Papua, became an IB PYP Candidate School and began its unlikely journey as an Indonesian National School to become a fully accredited IB PYP School. Unlikely because we were compelled to deliver the Indonesian National Curriculum, all our teaching staff are Indonesian teachers with no International or PYP experience and the language of instruction is Bahasa Indonesia. Traditional content and pedagogies were the norm, one could say a fixed mindset, and the concepts of homeroom teachers and inquiry based learning, unfamiliar. It was a very ambitious goal requiring an enormous amount of change. Was a marriage, a union, a fusion between these two disparate approaches to education possible? It seemed akin to mixing oil and water, but we took the positive approach of looking for possibilities, connections and solutions rather than getting caught up in the potential trap of “impossibilities”. We resolved to “Make the PYP Happen” in our school.

At every turn there was new learning, new language, adaptation and challenge. Ongoing and consistent professional development and a team approach were key ingredients. A willingness to embrace change was an essential component to building capacity for all staff. But even small changes can be confronting and we were embarking on large scale changes in many facets of teaching and learning, leadership and school organisation. To facilitate such change, developing a sense of partnership, trust and collaboration cannot be given enough emphasis. A team of Expat educators worked alongside the elementary (SD) teaching and leadership teams to develop a plan of action, organise and present ongoing professional development workshops about aspects of the PYP, build teamwork at various levels and develop a culture of collaboration. It has been a very steep learning curve for all, a curve we continue on, albeit more gradual now.

In terms of program we began with the National Curriculum 2006 with the Kompetensi Inti, Kompetensi Dasar, set subjects, set amounts of time per subject and so on, quite a prescription. There were no indicators to give an idea of what the Kompetensi Dasar might translate to in terms of program content, scope and sequence of subjects across grade levels. The subjects were isolated islands and we needed to connect them conceptually within the framework of the PYP. Indicators for each curriculum area were developed over time and mapped across the 6 Transdisciplinary Themes. From the various contexts of the themes and the mapped curriculum content we worked collaboratively to create our first units of inquiry. During the process teachers were learning how to write central ideas and lines of inquiry. They attached key concepts, Learner Profiles and Attitudes, and identified the Transdisciplinary skills which would support student learning. Implementation was a trial and error process and planning sessions involved reflective conversations around successes, failures, frustrations, pedagogy and strategies. It was challenging to say the least. Of course, there were degrees of resistance, but there was also enthusiasm and commitment. For change to be sustainable it has to be done gradually over time, celebrating successes and breakthroughs no matter how small, to build confidence, knowledge and skills. One step at a time … having successfully developed and taught our first units was a great start toward reaching our goal.

Then, after two years of developing units and consolidating practices we were faced with the challenge of the new National Curriculum 2013. Much discussion centred around avoiding it or embracing it. So we came full circle, embraced it and reviewed our existing units. The changes for Curriculum 2013 not only involved changes centred around content in the form of the Kompetensi Dasar. There was also a change of thinking about approaches to education. There were changes to the basic framework and structure for Sekolah Dasar.

Section C of the Regulation of the Minister of Education, “KERANGKA DASAR DAN STRUKTUR KURIKULUM SEKOLAH DASAR” (translated) focused on Improving the Mindset with the following changes:

“1) teacher-centered learning patterns become learning centered on students.

2) teacher centred instruction (teacher to student) to become interactive teaching and learning (interactive teacher-students-community-natural environment, sources / other media)

3) isolated learning into networked learning (learners can gain knowledge from anyone and from anywhere that can be sourced via the internet)

4) passive learning into active learning (active student learning strengthened with inquiry science learning approach)

5) individual learning into group learning (team-based)

6) single source learning into multimedia-based learning tools

7) whole class teaching into the looking at the needs of students by strengthening the development of the each student’s potential

8) single subject learning (monodiscipline) into multidisciplinary learning

9) passive learning to critical learning

B. Characteristics of Curriculum 2013

1) The 2013 curriculum is designed to develop a balance between the development of spiritual and social attitudes, curiosity, creativity, cooperation with intellectual and psychomotor abilities.

2) Schools are part of a community that provides a planned learning experience in which learners apply what is learned in school to the community and to utilize the community as a learning resource.

3) Develop attitudes, knowledge, and skills and apply them in various situations in schools and communities.

4) Allow sufficient time to develop attitudes, knowledge, and skills.”

The key areas of the National curriculum section D are:

  1. The work of individual teachers is transformed into a collaborative working approach.
  2. Strengthening school management through strengthening the Principal’s management capability as an educational leader.
  3. Strengtheneing of facilities and infrastructure for the benefit of management and the process of learning.”

These positive changes could be readily translated through identifiable similarities with the PYP approach to learning and teaching. This made the transition from a National School to a PYP school readily justifiable through clearer connections and gave us the freedom needed to explore ways in which we could deliver successfully on both fronts.

With renewed impetus we set upon embracing the task of redeveloping (and creating new) indicators in all curriculum areas and developing new units for each Grade level. We took a fresh look at the Transdisciplinary Themes and, in Grade level teams, remapped the new curriculum indicators, wrote new units and a created a new Program of Inquiry. The benefits of having taught the “old” units for two years and the many hours of professional development the teachers and leaders had engaged with, was evident in the discussions taking place throughout this collaborative mapping process. As they say, “practice makes perfect” and it was certainly much easier the second time around. The teachers had a greater understanding of the key concepts, the Learner Profile, Attitudes and Transdisciplinary Skills, which resulted in a more purposeful distribution of these across the new units. All these new units were successfully trialed in 2014-15 and changes made in response to reflective discussions throughout the teaching of each unit. During that year several teachers took part in Harvard’s online Making Thinking Visible course and shared their learning through presentations at Staff Meetings. Strategies from these presentations were discussed at collaborative planning meetings and incorporated into the class program, enriching learning experiences and strengthening literacy connections within the units. We felt quite a degree of achievement and recognized that we had made great progress over the past 2 and a half years. At the same time we acknowledged that there was still much to do and consolidate in order to reach our goal. Further guidance in the form of an Evaluation Report would be a welcome document to help shape future developments, clarify goals and professional development needs within the school to support the continuation of our journey.

In March of 2015 our IB PYP Consultant recommended our school for an Accreditation Visit. Our visit was scheduled for September of 2015. Of course the prospect of our visit brought feelings of great excitement, along with feelings of trepidation. Could we be successful? Had we managed to emulsify the oil and the water? The 6 months between March and September would pass quickly, especially with a 6 week holiday break in the mix! As you all know, preparation was full on and continuous for all our Elementary staff in the 6 months leading up to the visit. Each person had a role to play and a responsibility to contribute to the success of the school. Each person showed commitment to being fully prepared and felt proud to be part of Team SD, KK.

In November 2015 we received our official notification from the IBO ….. our Team was successful …. We had “Made the PYP Happen” …. we became an Accredited IB PYP school. We appreciate the feedback we received and continue to work to be the best school we can be …. there will always be things to improve on, new learning, fresh perspectives ….. because gaining PYP Accreditation is not a destination but an interim prize on a continuous journey in education.

We are Sekolah YPJ, Kuala Kencana, proudly Papuan, proudly Indonesian.

Bahasa Indonesia is our language of instruction

We continue to mix the water with the oil, if we stand still we will separate, and we have worked too hard to allow that to happen.

Reference: “SALINAN, LAMPIRAN, PERATURAN MENTERI PENDIDIKAN DAN KEBUDAYAAN

NOMOR 67 TAHUN 2013 TENTANG KERANGKA DASAR DAN STRUKTUR KURIKULUM SEKOLAH DASAR/MADRASAH IBTIDAIYAH”

 

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The Art of Storytelling

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Have you ever wondered how teachers like us do storytelling? What are the different ideas in storytelling? How will you tell a funny or a scary story? These are some questions that popped up in one of our coffee breaks.

To begin with,

What is story telling?

The National Storytelling Network defines storytelling as an action that involves a two-way interaction between a storyteller and one or more listeners. Storytelling happens in many situations, from kitchen-table conversation to religious rituals, from telling in the course of other work to performances for thousands of paying listeners. Some storytelling situations demand informality. Others are highly formal. Some demand certain themes, attitudes, and artistic approaches. The expectations about listener interaction and the nature of the story itself vary widely.

Our students define storytelling as:

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And as teachers, we define storytelling as a way of expressing our feelings through story. Storytelling is enticing the listener to create mental images while we tell through words and actions. Storytelling connects the storyteller and the listener through imagination. Most of the interesting stories are about people. Therefore to make a story better to be understood, focus your story to real-life characters.

How do you choose a story?

The secret of a worthwhile story time is choosing the right book.

Children should be exposed to broad types of literature available to them in the classroom and as much as possible at home. Literature types include picture books, big books, concept books, chapter books, pop-up books, sensory books, nursery rhyme books, fairytale books, and folktale books.

How do you tell a story?

There are easy ways of telling a story to children:

  1. Reader’s position

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The storyteller should be relaxed and comfortably seated or standing up.

2. Position of book

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Hold the book and visual aids where children can view it well. Show the pictures slowly around the audience.

3. Actions

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Use actions that go with the story to add interest. The body movement is an important factor in telling a story.

4. Eye contact

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Use eye contact to relate to your audience. Let your eyes and facial expression help tell them the story.

5. Speed

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Use a clear, natural speaking voice and vary the pace according to the story. Take time and never rush through the story.

6. Response of children/peers

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Respect children’s comments and reactions, yet retain control of the group.

How do you introduce a story?

  • Unlock difficult words that will be encountered in the story.
  • Ask motivating questions related to the child’s experience that will arouse his/her interest in the story.
  • Set the stage for the story and capture the children’s attention before you begin to read.
  • Make the children sit well
  • Begin by telling the title, author, and illustrator.

Storytelling presentation and activities in a creative way:

  • Making a story book

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  •   Comic strip

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  •  Role play (puppet)
  •  Story cube

   

   

  • See through story

Storyteller use projector screen as a tool to tell story.

  •  Story maze/ story map

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As we end our coffee break, stories about work, family, students and whatever under the sun continue to flood our imagination. We hope you were able to get some ideas from one of our coffee breaks. So sip that cup of coffee and share your story with a friend.

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By: Camelia Tjandra and Jose Noel Veloso

Grade 1 Teachers

BINUS SCHOOL Simprug

ctjandra@binus.edu; jveloso@binus.edu