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Teaching the Sustainable Development Goals to Students

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Every year, we collaboratively review our school written curriculum based on the IB requirements. Reviewing the curriculum is related to Standard C2.9, which states that “the written curriculum is informed by current IB publications and is reviewed regularly to incorporate developments in the programme(s)”.

In doing the review this year, we made sure that the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are taught and addressed in our curriculum in addition to the IB Primary Years Programme and Indonesian national requirements.

The SDGs are “Global Goals” in which world leaders from 193 countries, including Indonesia, are committed to achieving by 2030.   The goals are inter-related and include eradicating poverty, hunger and inequality; taking action on climate change and the environment; improving access to health, education and clean water and sanitation; and building strong institutions and partnerships. Adopted in 2015, the SDGs are as follows:

SDGs

Source: http://www.undp.org/content/undp/en/home/sustainable-development-goals.html

Involved in our curriculum review were all our classroom and single-subject teachers as well as our co-teachers from early years and elementary. The outcome of our review revealed that all the 17 goals were already part of our early years and elementary written curriculum and we need to continue explicitly addressing them in our taught curriculum.

For the review, we identified the specific unit of inquiry linked to each goal. During our review, it was interesting that our physical education and dance teachers developed plans on how to teach the SDGs in their subjects across grade levels.

Teaching the SDGs to our students is connected to the IB mission statement of creating a “better and more peaceful world” and developing “internationally minded people”. It is  related to Standard C2.7, which states that “the written curriculum promotes student awareness of individual, local, national and world issues”. Likewise, it is linked to Standard C2.14b, which emphasizes that “teaching and learning empowers students to take self-initiated action as a result of the learning”.

Achieving the SDGs is not only the work of governments and non-governmental organizations. As educators, we need to do our part and also become globally competent.

By: Richel Langit-Dursin

Primary Years Programme coordinator

BINUS SCHOOL Simprug, Jakarta

mdursin@binus.edu

 

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Celebrating Indonesia’s Independence Day

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Celebrating Indonesia’s Independence Day

August 17 is a special day for Indonesia. Every year, we celebrate Indonesia’s Independence Day. The world’s most populous nation, Indonesia gained its independence from Dutch colonial rule on August 17, 1945.

This year, our students were very excited in participating in the country’s Independence Day celebration. They asked what games they were going to play. Yes! Apart from flag raising, we usually commemorate our national day by playing traditional games such as tug of war, sack race, and cracker-eating contest.

The commemoration of Indonesia’s Independence Day at our school was very memorable this year as our students sang national songs and did a traditional costume parade showcasing the culture of various provinces such as Maluku, Papua, Sumatra and Sulawesi.

In celebrating Indonesia’s Independence Day, our students are reminded of the history of our country, including our national heroes who fought for freedom. Here are some pictures of Indonesia’s Independence Day celebration in our school.

Flag raising led by our school principal

Traditional costume parade by our students

Cracker-eating contest, one of the traditional games, played by our students

By: Nancy Benedicta, Grade 3 Team Teacher and Eka Fridayanti, Grade 3 Co-Teacher

BINUS SCHOOL Simprug

nbenedicta@binus.edu; efridayanti@binus.edu

Year 2 Independence Celebration

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As we celebrated Indonesia’s Independence Day on August 17th, all the students from Reception to Year 6 had a flag ceremony in the gymnasium in the morning. Afterwards, each year level had their own celebration by organizing some competitions or events. Year 2 had some games to play in groups such as transferring marbles from one spoon to another as fast as they could, putting a pen which was tied in the middle of a parachute into a bottle, and dancing with a partner with a ball between their foreheads. Not to forget sharing the special meaning of August 17th’s annual celebration of Indonesia’s Independence Day.

-Year 2 team Global Jaya School-.