Jakarta Multicultural School – Y5 PYP Exhibition

Posted on

As we know in the final year of the PYP, students, carry out an extended, in-depth, collaborative project known as the PYP exhibition. JMS students worked collaboratively to conduct an in-depth inquiry into real life issues of water pollution and the importance of recycling under the unit Sharing the Planet – save the Earth as its the only planet with chocolates. Students collectively synthesised all of the essential elements of the PYP in ways that can be shared with the whole school community.

To go further with the Inquiry they visited the XS project which is a non-profit organization (Yayasan) that works to improve the lives of families living in Jakarta’s trash picker communities.

There they learnt that the XSProject receives donations of discarded materials such as billboards, banners and automobile upholstery. From this waste, they create fun, functional and upcycled products that find a new life with consumers and create social awareness about the effects of trash.

Our students along with the parents took part into the exhibition process with lot of enthusiasm. With the collaborating support of the parents,the head of school and under the guidance of the mentors the students were able to film a short move called “Tomorrow Land” where they went into the future to show how life would be if without any nature around us.

Various areas of curriculum were also covered during the whole exhibition preparation like Language Arts, Social Studies, Science, and Health and nutrition.

The students also got the opportunity to interview Mr. Asrul one of the directors from another project that works to save the marine life, specifically the corals. The organization is known as Yayasan terumburupa, and consists of divers that collaborate and work to restore the corals and help them grow. The best part is that we can also adopt a coral and contribute our little in saving Mother Earth.

The students had fun creating different games for the visitors, making posters, putting up all the display, making different models of sea creatures, filming the movie and learnt a lot during the field trips and interviews as well.

By Ms Saran Kaur

Year 5 Teacher

saran@jimsch.org

Here are a few pictures from our Exhibition from the batch of 2016-2017

C:\Users\user\Downloads\IMG-20170420-WA0067.jpg C:\Users\user\Downloads\20170504_140102.jpg

C:\Users\user\Downloads\20170504_120836.jpg C:\Users\user\Downloads\20170504_120736.jpg

C:\Users\user\Downloads\20170504_120733.jpg C:\Users\user\Downloads\20170504_120854.jpg

C:\Users\user\Downloads\20170504_120903.jpg C:\Users\user\Downloads\20170322_110449 (1).jpg

C:\Users\user\Downloads\20170505_101033 (1).jpg

Teaching Through Games

Posted on Updated on

Let’s play games!

Teachers use lots of ways in conducting their lessons. One of them is through games. The advantages of using games for students include:

  1. Competition factor: Generate positive competition among peers to achieve stated objectives of the games
  2. Discipline factor: Allow students to be able to follow series of instructions or rules.
  3. Unity factor: Teach students about teamwork, sense of belonging and unselfishness. Games also encourage the students to play for teams instead of their own personal accomplishment.
  4. Confidence factor: Games enhance students’ confidence and communication skills.

Here are some games that I have used for teaching students mathematical concepts.

Game 1: “Throw the Ball”

Rules:

  1. Place 4 trays in line. Put some division facts in each tray. The closest tray consists of the most difficult questions. The easiest questions are in the furthest tray.
  2. Students make a line and give them a ball (I used ping pong balls) and asked them to shoot the ball into the tray. Yes, most of them tried to shoot the ball in the furthest tray, which has the easiest questions.
  3. If the ball is out, students will line up again from the back.

4. Once the ball got into the tray, ask students to get a piece of paper and answer the questions by themselves.

5. If they can’t answer in a given time, students will then line up from the back.

6. Finish this game until all the questions have been answered.

Game 2: “Solving Word Problems”

Rules:

  1. Prepare papers with question. Label each paper 1, 2, 3 and so on.
  2. Divide class into groups.
  3. Each group stands in front of a piece of paper.
  4. Let students answer the questions on post-it notes. Tell them to put the answers at the back of the paper.

5. Ask students to move clockwise to the next paper.

6. Stop until all the groups are back to their first paper.

7. Discuss the answers together.

Game 3: “Group Yourselves Equally”

Rules:

  1. The students stand in a circle.

2. Give the question, “Group yourselves into 2”, “Group yourselves into 3”, and so on.

3. Ask students to count how many groups they made.

4. Write down the number with the equal answers. Examples include 9 (18 ÷ 2) and 6 (18 ÷ 3).

5. Discuss why some students were not in groups. It means the number cannot be divided equally. Examples are 18 ÷ 4 and 18 ÷ 5.

6. Discuss and review what numbers are really equal if you divide for 18.

 

I found that the students really enjoyed these games. The students actively participated and cooperated well during the activities. Using games in teaching creates an exciting learning atmosphere for the students and the teachers as well.

By: Debby Selvianita

Grade 1 Co-Teacher

BINUS SCHOOL Simprug

dselvianita@binus.edu

Reference:

Yahmad, S. B. H. Motivating students with games.

Authentic Assessment

Posted on

 

Authentic assessment measures learning achievements that are worthwhile, significant, and meaningful. An authentic assessment requires students to be at the center of the learning and should allow students to select from a variety of tasks. The assessment should require students to apply the knowledge and skills they have acquired. Parents can use data from their child’s authentic assessments to understand how to best help their child. Understanding how their child learns best.

How can parents help with authentic assessments?

Assessment is an opportunity to help your child improve. Parents should discuss any concerns they may have with the teachers. This will assist both teachers and parents when deciding what could possibly be done next to support the student. To make sure that the learning continues at home and at school, these are Questions Your Child’s Teacher Would Love to Answer about Assessment:

  • What are the most important and complex ideas my child needs to understand?
  • What can I do to support the learning at home?
  • What kinds of questions do you ask my children on a daily basis?
  • What are the teaching strategies you will use throughout the unit?

By having a similar perspective of the assessment, parents and school can cooperate to identify what students know, understand, can do, and value at different stages in the teaching and learning process. It is also expected that the students can make meaning of each little thing they learn at school by themselves and relate it to their lives.

How do we assess what students know and what students want to learn?

Pre-assessment

At Cikal, pre-assessment plays an important role in a teacher’s ability to differentiate instruction. We set pre-assessments before we deliver the instruction in a curricular unit in order to gain an understanding of what our students know, understand, and are able to do. Without pre-assessment, we do not know the readiness of our students for new learning. For example in Year 3,  we begin with unpacking the central idea or learning topic through discussion. Observations can be conducted by the teacher to identify which students have or have not achieved mastery of specific objectives.

Having a question-answer activity during a lesson, is also another useful strategy we use in class.

Teacher: How can you understand the author’s purpose if you only look at the book’s cover?

Click the video link :

Language and Literature : The Author’s Purpose

Using this strategy in the classroom will provide an opportunity for each student in a group to record individual responses and ideas (prior knowledge) regarding an issue, topic or question. The strategy can also be used to brainstorm ideas or record researched information. It will help teachers to plan learning activities that address various levels of student readiness as well.

Formative Assessment

It’s important to use a variety of teaching and learning formative assessments, changing them frequently to stimulate both students and teachers. Assessment techniques are only as limited as the teacher’s imagination! -globaldigitalcitizen-

During our Economic unit, teachers asked students to express their understanding of the concept of economics. To assist with this process the teacher had set up the class as a market, where students became involved as customer / buyers. They were given a sum of money to be spent for their needs. Throughout this process, teachers could observe how students participated in the buying and selling process. This information was then utilized when teachers delivered future lessons.

This kind of activity helps teachers evaluate the learning process, adjust the plan for the next learning and create an effective summative for the students.

Click the video link :

Supply and Demand Activity

Summative Assessment

In Year 3, summative assessments are generally creative, evaluative and reflective, rather than paper and pencil tests that only assess students’ knowledge. Teachers will give students the opportunity to improve themselves. For instance, in our Math Summative Assessment project where the central idea was ‘we use fractions to make our lives easier’, students were asked to make a pizza with toppings. This project was chosen as the project should be simple, useful and apply in our life. To begin the project, students collected a pizza box (any size) as the main material. Students were provided with a set of instructions, for example, they needed to divide the pizza into 8 equal parts, choose pizza toppings to represent particular fractions (at least 3 different fractions needed to be modeled ⅛, 2/8, 4/8), convert the fraction into 3 forms of equivalent fraction and order them from the least to greatest fraction. The students showed enthusiasm during this project, not just because they like pizza, but because they could understand why they were learning.

cikal cilandak.png

Ari Wibowo

Grade 4 Teacher

Sekolah Cikal Cilandak

Solving Problems The United Nations Ways

Posted on

Another school year is about to end.  As an IB teacher, it is a necessary to look back on the school year that was and reflect on the best, as well as the most challenging practices that you and your kids went through.  It may not always seem like it, yet I believe that the most challenging tasks make the most effective learning experiences.  I am honoured to have been given this privilege of sharing a glimpse of one of my most rewarding and productive performance tasks in Year 5 this year.  

Unit 5 embraces the transdisciplinary theme, “Sharing the planet,” with the central idea: People can establish practices in order to sustain and maintain the Earth’s resources and with the following lines of inquiry: (a) the limited nature of the Earth’s resources, (b) personal choices that can help to sustain the environment, (c) reusing and recycling different materials, and (d) reducing waste.  Planning and preparations are the most taxing part of teaching in an IB school.  PYP planning and preparation have this trick of making you begin thinking of an end in your mind.  Yes, from the scope and sequence, I had to plan for a summative assessment involving knowledge, skills and attitudes that I would like my students to learn and achieve, which should also be anchored to the writing genre of that unit.  And since it is not only for my personal stand- alone planning, it has demanded a collaborative effort among the other teachers in the team.  As a result, ICT, Maths and UoI have been been supporting our English performance task assessment.

Persuasive writing is not very popular among students.  For one, they are required to present them orally, after writing it. Having these particular students 2 years in a row gave me the opportunity to get to know them well and see what more they can do to let them push themselves beyond their limits.  I know it will be a big challenge, but it is going to be worth it.

I still remember the day when I first broke the news to them that they are going to engage themselves in a MUNA simulation as their Unit 5’s performance task.  Blank faces. Clueless stares. Unending reactions of ha? I can still vividly remember the expressions from the faces of every student in my class that day. The reaction didn’t change even after I explained what it was about.  Reactions only changed  days after we started planning and preparing for it.   

MUNA simulation is a simulation of the United Nations Assembly in solving various world problems. Since the unit is about sustaining an maintaining Earth’s resources, I assigned everyone in a group and every group to a country.  Their task was to research for at least 3 of their country’s natural resources problems.  From those 3, they had to come up with just 1.  And from that, as a group, they had to think about possible and effective solutions to solve it. And then, they will have to present this in a simulation of a United Nations Forum, following the rules and procedures of the United Nations assembly in solving world issues.  In addition to that, during the simulation, they had to convince the delegates from other countries to support their resolutions.  So, they had to answer the questions that would be thrown to them, and be able to defend their position when being questioned.  From that day on, a shift in the way they dealt with the task had changed. And the rest was history.

On the day of the MUNA simulation, everyone looked so professional. They got the feeling of being a real UN delegate. They were wearing formal attire, and holding folders of everything that they had researched and discussed about during the process.  The rules and procedures were followed religiously.  Everyone got the chance to deliver a speech.  Every group got the chance to shine, by being prepared with their questions and their answers for other countries’ clarification and motions. Everything was mostly based on researched facts and collaborative decision. The exchange of thoughts and ideas was spontaneous and professionally handled by every delegate.  

This activity only proves that you can not underestimate children.  You may think that they are still very young to deal with global issues. But if you equip them with meaningful knowledge and the right skills, and prepared them accordingly, they can do wonders.  And oh, yes, there were some glitches along the way.  There were groups who would blame each other and think that they wouldn’t be able to make it, collaboration concerns, personal differences issues.  But we should remember that everything about it, including the glitches and crashes, were parts of the learning experience.  And yes, most of the time, they are the most valuable ones.  

Here are some examples of the students reflection:

Untitled.png

Technology in the classroom: Embedding ICT into units of inquiry

Posted on

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

There is no doubt that children are more engaged in technology these days than any other time in the past. Teaching and nurturing a digital native allows teachers, as digital immigrants, the opportunity to learn and adapt within an innovative digital world. Students agree that ICT tools are very beneficial in helping them complete school assignments. They believe that when ICT is integrated with teaching instructions in the classroom a more engaging and meaningful learning process will take place.

In Year 4, we are committed to embedding ICT into everyday classroom practices. Some examples of activities that have been conducted in class are:

 

  • School Email

 

Starting from Year 3,  Sekolah Cikal have provided students with a personal school email. The purpose of this email is to accommodate students needs in ICT, particularly when utilizing web applications for school purposes. In Year 4, students have to check their email regularly to keep their assignments and projects up to date.

 

  • Google Classroom

 

The need for virtual classrooms in education has been raised in order to enlarge the scope of learning. The teaching and learning process can be broaden outside the classroom, this enables both students and teachers to interact and discuss specific subjects through Google Classroom. Since the beginning of Year 4, teachers have utilized this application as a way to send school assignments and projects.

 

  • Google Docs & Google Slides

 

Year 4 utilize Google docs and Google slides as a part of our ICT commitment to paperless tasks. Google docs and Google slides allow students to collaborate on their ideas within one file. Each term, Year 4 publishes a collaborative E-Book, all students participate and share their ideas. This activity has empowered students to engage actively in their writing process.

 

  • Google Sites

 

Students are encourage to share their academic performance in a portfolio as a part of taking ownership of their learning. Google Sites is a suitable platform for Year 4 students to showcase their learning evidence and share it with their friends and parents.

WHAT’S NEW THIS TERM

As members of a lifelong learning community, Year 4 teachers are determined to continuously enhance their skills and commitment to strengthen student’s ICT competencies. In the coming term we have made arrangements for the following ICT programs:

 

  • Infographic application Canva

 

This web based app will assist Year 4 students in creating an infographic campaign about the use of media. Data collection for the infographic will be gathered using surveys as a part of our math data handling unit. Students will also need to apply principles and elements of art in their campaign.

 

  • iMovie

 

Students are expected to create a video campaign using iMovie to encourage the audience to use media safely. The skills will be developed through classroom instruction and we will consistently utilize the media resources center to heighten students ICT knowledge.

One of the challenges that teachers often encounter is the amount of distraction that arises due to the use of a gadget. Teachers frequently ask students to complete their tasks within a specific time frame and limit their distraction by implying several strategies. Students can easily get carried away when they are in front of technological devices.

Here are a few ways to enhance students self regulated skills as well as prevent over attachment to gadgets at home:

  1. Parents and children can establish an essential agreement on how to use the technological devices or web based applications safely.
  2. Parents and children can create a schedule of appropriate time for using the device, and plan fun physical activities for children to engage in at other times.
  3. Parents can remind children about the importance of moderation. Be sure to offer praise when they demonstrate restraint in the use of technological devices and follow the agreement that has been set.
  4. Write down the objective for using a technological device and set a time limit. Ensure children adhere to the time constraint.

Laksmi Wijayanti

Grade 4 teacher

Sekolah Cikal

The Benefits of Interschool Collaboration.

Posted on

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Given the difficulties (political, corporate and logistical ) that we face as a company sponsored school based on a mountain top in Papua, we at Yayasan Pendidikan Jayawijaya Tembagapura often find ourselves feeling isolated from the greater IB community. Movement off the mountain is difficult at the best of times and when it comes to trying to get a group of students to be able to visit another school or exhibition, it is neigh impossible. Luckily, here in Tembagapura we have two IBO schools, our own YPJ TPRA and the Mount Zaagham School (MZS), which provides opportunity for collaboration. While the make-up of our two schools is very different with MZS providing education for the children of the expat workers at Grasberg Mine and PT Freeport and YPJ being the school for national and Papuan students; we do share a compound, community and the PYP. With these direct connections, the existence of interschool collaboration is a natural occurrence.

Because of the aforementioned isolation, interschool collaborative learning has significant meaning for bridging the social and educational gaps between our schools and providing much needed collaborative opportunities for our teachers and students. The understanding that our two schools are able to achieve more working together than is possible working in isolation and that the combined effort and resources of our two schools will produce better outcomes than relying each as a single school have led to some very successful collaborations between us.

A great example of this collaborative practice is the recent Kartini Day celebration in which our two schools worked together to create a program in which students grades in one through nine from both schools came together in a celebration of the ideals and values that Raden Adjeng Kartini stood for. One of our teachers Aron Vaughn worked closely with the Art and Bahasa Indonesian teachers from MZS to create collaborative activities such as mural painting, plays and dances that brought our two schools together for a wonderful celebration of the theme of Equality: All Life is Valuable. To all accounts, it was a great success with students and teachers from both schools learning and celebrating together.

Having the opportunity to collaborate with another IB school has afforded other benefits to our teachers and students such as:

-A greater ability of students to view situations from others’ perspectives.

-Creating an environment of active, involved, exploratory learning.

-Encouraging diversity understanding.

-Establishing an atmosphere of cooperation.

-Students develop responsibility for each other.

-The development of tolerance.

-The development of the ability to adopt perspectives and the understanding different from their own points of view.

Taking the opportunity to bring diverse students, teachers and schools together and providing opportunities to construct understanding through a collaborative atmosphere is at the heart of the PYP and one that we look forward to continuing in the coming years.

 

A Snapshot of Our PYP Journey

Posted on

C:\Users\sbeardmo\Pictures\SLC March Part 2\Sekolah YPJ 4.JPG

Sekolah Yayasan Pendidikan Jayawijaya, Kuala Kencana, Papua

by Sandra Beardmore, PYP Coordinator.

(There were many aspects of change, program and school development as we travelled the road to PYP Accreditation, I share a small slice in this article.)

In 2012 Sekolah YPJ, Kuala Kencana, Papua, became an IB PYP Candidate School and began its unlikely journey as an Indonesian National School to become a fully accredited IB PYP School. Unlikely because we were compelled to deliver the Indonesian National Curriculum, all our teaching staff are Indonesian teachers with no International or PYP experience and the language of instruction is Bahasa Indonesia. Traditional content and pedagogies were the norm, one could say a fixed mindset, and the concepts of homeroom teachers and inquiry based learning, unfamiliar. It was a very ambitious goal requiring an enormous amount of change. Was a marriage, a union, a fusion between these two disparate approaches to education possible? It seemed akin to mixing oil and water, but we took the positive approach of looking for possibilities, connections and solutions rather than getting caught up in the potential trap of “impossibilities”. We resolved to “Make the PYP Happen” in our school.

At every turn there was new learning, new language, adaptation and challenge. Ongoing and consistent professional development and a team approach were key ingredients. A willingness to embrace change was an essential component to building capacity for all staff. But even small changes can be confronting and we were embarking on large scale changes in many facets of teaching and learning, leadership and school organisation. To facilitate such change, developing a sense of partnership, trust and collaboration cannot be given enough emphasis. A team of Expat educators worked alongside the elementary (SD) teaching and leadership teams to develop a plan of action, organise and present ongoing professional development workshops about aspects of the PYP, build teamwork at various levels and develop a culture of collaboration. It has been a very steep learning curve for all, a curve we continue on, albeit more gradual now.

In terms of program we began with the National Curriculum 2006 with the Kompetensi Inti, Kompetensi Dasar, set subjects, set amounts of time per subject and so on, quite a prescription. There were no indicators to give an idea of what the Kompetensi Dasar might translate to in terms of program content, scope and sequence of subjects across grade levels. The subjects were isolated islands and we needed to connect them conceptually within the framework of the PYP. Indicators for each curriculum area were developed over time and mapped across the 6 Transdisciplinary Themes. From the various contexts of the themes and the mapped curriculum content we worked collaboratively to create our first units of inquiry. During the process teachers were learning how to write central ideas and lines of inquiry. They attached key concepts, Learner Profiles and Attitudes, and identified the Transdisciplinary skills which would support student learning. Implementation was a trial and error process and planning sessions involved reflective conversations around successes, failures, frustrations, pedagogy and strategies. It was challenging to say the least. Of course, there were degrees of resistance, but there was also enthusiasm and commitment. For change to be sustainable it has to be done gradually over time, celebrating successes and breakthroughs no matter how small, to build confidence, knowledge and skills. One step at a time … having successfully developed and taught our first units was a great start toward reaching our goal.

Then, after two years of developing units and consolidating practices we were faced with the challenge of the new National Curriculum 2013. Much discussion centred around avoiding it or embracing it. So we came full circle, embraced it and reviewed our existing units. The changes for Curriculum 2013 not only involved changes centred around content in the form of the Kompetensi Dasar. There was also a change of thinking about approaches to education. There were changes to the basic framework and structure for Sekolah Dasar.

Section C of the Regulation of the Minister of Education, “KERANGKA DASAR DAN STRUKTUR KURIKULUM SEKOLAH DASAR” (translated) focused on Improving the Mindset with the following changes:

“1) teacher-centered learning patterns become learning centered on students.

2) teacher centred instruction (teacher to student) to become interactive teaching and learning (interactive teacher-students-community-natural environment, sources / other media)

3) isolated learning into networked learning (learners can gain knowledge from anyone and from anywhere that can be sourced via the internet)

4) passive learning into active learning (active student learning strengthened with inquiry science learning approach)

5) individual learning into group learning (team-based)

6) single source learning into multimedia-based learning tools

7) whole class teaching into the looking at the needs of students by strengthening the development of the each student’s potential

8) single subject learning (monodiscipline) into multidisciplinary learning

9) passive learning to critical learning

B. Characteristics of Curriculum 2013

1) The 2013 curriculum is designed to develop a balance between the development of spiritual and social attitudes, curiosity, creativity, cooperation with intellectual and psychomotor abilities.

2) Schools are part of a community that provides a planned learning experience in which learners apply what is learned in school to the community and to utilize the community as a learning resource.

3) Develop attitudes, knowledge, and skills and apply them in various situations in schools and communities.

4) Allow sufficient time to develop attitudes, knowledge, and skills.”

The key areas of the National curriculum section D are:

  1. The work of individual teachers is transformed into a collaborative working approach.
  2. Strengthening school management through strengthening the Principal’s management capability as an educational leader.
  3. Strengtheneing of facilities and infrastructure for the benefit of management and the process of learning.”

These positive changes could be readily translated through identifiable similarities with the PYP approach to learning and teaching. This made the transition from a National School to a PYP school readily justifiable through clearer connections and gave us the freedom needed to explore ways in which we could deliver successfully on both fronts.

With renewed impetus we set upon embracing the task of redeveloping (and creating new) indicators in all curriculum areas and developing new units for each Grade level. We took a fresh look at the Transdisciplinary Themes and, in Grade level teams, remapped the new curriculum indicators, wrote new units and a created a new Program of Inquiry. The benefits of having taught the “old” units for two years and the many hours of professional development the teachers and leaders had engaged with, was evident in the discussions taking place throughout this collaborative mapping process. As they say, “practice makes perfect” and it was certainly much easier the second time around. The teachers had a greater understanding of the key concepts, the Learner Profile, Attitudes and Transdisciplinary Skills, which resulted in a more purposeful distribution of these across the new units. All these new units were successfully trialed in 2014-15 and changes made in response to reflective discussions throughout the teaching of each unit. During that year several teachers took part in Harvard’s online Making Thinking Visible course and shared their learning through presentations at Staff Meetings. Strategies from these presentations were discussed at collaborative planning meetings and incorporated into the class program, enriching learning experiences and strengthening literacy connections within the units. We felt quite a degree of achievement and recognized that we had made great progress over the past 2 and a half years. At the same time we acknowledged that there was still much to do and consolidate in order to reach our goal. Further guidance in the form of an Evaluation Report would be a welcome document to help shape future developments, clarify goals and professional development needs within the school to support the continuation of our journey.

In March of 2015 our IB PYP Consultant recommended our school for an Accreditation Visit. Our visit was scheduled for September of 2015. Of course the prospect of our visit brought feelings of great excitement, along with feelings of trepidation. Could we be successful? Had we managed to emulsify the oil and the water? The 6 months between March and September would pass quickly, especially with a 6 week holiday break in the mix! As you all know, preparation was full on and continuous for all our Elementary staff in the 6 months leading up to the visit. Each person had a role to play and a responsibility to contribute to the success of the school. Each person showed commitment to being fully prepared and felt proud to be part of Team SD, KK.

In November 2015 we received our official notification from the IBO ….. our Team was successful …. We had “Made the PYP Happen” …. we became an Accredited IB PYP school. We appreciate the feedback we received and continue to work to be the best school we can be …. there will always be things to improve on, new learning, fresh perspectives ….. because gaining PYP Accreditation is not a destination but an interim prize on a continuous journey in education.

We are Sekolah YPJ, Kuala Kencana, proudly Papuan, proudly Indonesian.

Bahasa Indonesia is our language of instruction

We continue to mix the water with the oil, if we stand still we will separate, and we have worked too hard to allow that to happen.

Reference: “SALINAN, LAMPIRAN, PERATURAN MENTERI PENDIDIKAN DAN KEBUDAYAAN

NOMOR 67 TAHUN 2013 TENTANG KERANGKA DASAR DAN STRUKTUR KURIKULUM SEKOLAH DASAR/MADRASAH IBTIDAIYAH”

 

C:\Users\sbeardmo\Pictures\SLC April 2017\P1030690.JPG
C:\Users\sbeardmo\Pictures\PAUD\P1030502.JPG C:\Users\sbeardmo\Pictures\Grade 3 Exhibition\DSC_0455.JPG

C:\Users\sbeardmo\Pictures\foto guru.jpg